Cool Chicks from History Missing from Wikipedia

For any Wikipedia editors out there (or any students required to edit for school): a list of women missing from Wikipedia.  Over 20 new Wikipedia pages were created the last time a Cool Chicks from History Missing from Wikipedia list as posted.  Hopefully this list will be as successful.  

Betty Abbot, the first woman on the Omaha City Council, lacks a Wikipedia page.  

Hannah Smith Arnett does not have a Wikipedia page.  

Mary Brewster’s Wikipedia page has no sources.

Mary Desha and Mary Lockwood were founding members of the DAR, but do not have Wikipedia pages.  Both are profiled on the DAR website.  Mary is briefly mentioned on the Wikipedia page of her father John C. Breckinridge.

Rosa Maria Hinojosa de Balli does not have a Wikipedia page.  Her son, Padre Balli also lacks a Wikipedia page.  He is mention on the National Parks website and in the articles about his mother.  The Wikipedia article on Padre Island neglects to mention Rosa, although other sources mention she was initially a joint owner with her son.

Lilli Hornig lacks a Wikipedia page, but she is mentioned on her husband’s page

Christian Milne has a Wikipedia page, but it could be greatly improved by including information from this interview.

Colleen Moore has a Wikipedia page, but it a little odd and includes lists of brief residences.  

Delfina Ortega Diaz has a Wikipedia page but it lacks sources and the syntax is very poor.  It looks like the Spanish page was run through Google translate.

Petrona Rosende has a Wikipedia page in Spanish, but no page in English.

Corinne Michael West lacks a Wikipedia page.  

Vicken von Post-Börjesson has a Wikipedia page in Swedish, but no page in English.

The categories for 16th and 17th century women scientists have only one entry a piece and there is no category for 18th century women scientists.  Additional scientists from those centuries include Sophie Germain, Émilie du Châtelet, Maria Winkelmann Kirch, Maria Gaetana Agnesi, Maria Sibylla Merian, Justine Siegemund, Louise Bourgeois Boursier, and Wang Zhenyl.

Policewomen - the woman “Cop” (a dream). Suffragette posed to illustrate woman police concept - Cincinnati, 1909.

Policewomen - the woman “Cop” (a dream). Suffragette posed to illustrate woman police concept - Cincinnati, 1909.

historicroyalpalaces:

Today in 1839: Queen Victoria proposes to Prince Albert
They are married early in the following year and remain devoted to one another until Albert’s death in 1861.  The couple had nine children and 42 grandchildren, including four monarchs.  After her husband’s death, Victoria spent her remaining years in an intense state of mourning.
Find out more about the greatest royal love story: http://bit.ly/1cs5CpG

historicroyalpalaces:

Today in 1839: Queen Victoria proposes to Prince Albert

They are married early in the following year and remain devoted to one another until Albert’s death in 1861.  The couple had nine children and 42 grandchildren, including four monarchs.  After her husband’s death, Victoria spent her remaining years in an intense state of mourning.

Find out more about the greatest royal love story: http://bit.ly/1cs5CpG

Manuela Medina circa 1813
Art by Lollercakesxo (tumblr)
Manuela Medina led a battalion of troops during the Mexican War of Independence.  Almost nothing is known of her life, but she is believed to have participated in no less than seven battles.

Manuela Medina circa 1813

Art by Lollercakesxo (tumblr)

Manuela Medina led a battalion of troops during the Mexican War of Independence.  Almost nothing is known of her life, but she is believed to have participated in no less than seven battles.

Rosa Maria Hinojosa de Balli (1752-1803)
Art by Maliha (tumblr)
Rosa was born in the area that is today known as Tamaulipas, Mexico.  Her parents were early settlers of New Spain and as such they were awarded large land grants by the crown.  When she was a teenager, Rosa’s family moved to Reynosa, a town on the Rio Grande, where her father had been appointed mayor.  Rosa went on to marry José María Ballí, a captain in the militia who had his own extensive land holdings.
By 1790, Rosa’s father and husband had both died, leaving her a vast estate.  Over the next thirteen years, Rosa doubled her landholdings.  With her large herds of livestock, Rosa was the first cattle queen of Texas.  Devoutly Catholic, she endowed churches on both sides of the Rio Grande.   At the time of her death, she owned more than a million acres of land.

Rosa Maria Hinojosa de Balli (1752-1803)

Art by Maliha (tumblr)

Rosa was born in the area that is today known as Tamaulipas, Mexico.  Her parents were early settlers of New Spain and as such they were awarded large land grants by the crown.  When she was a teenager, Rosa’s family moved to Reynosa, a town on the Rio Grande, where her father had been appointed mayor.  Rosa went on to marry José María Ballí, a captain in the militia who had his own extensive land holdings.

By 1790, Rosa’s father and husband had both died, leaving her a vast estate.  Over the next thirteen years, Rosa doubled her landholdings.  With her large herds of livestock, Rosa was the first cattle queen of Texas.  Devoutly Catholic, she endowed churches on both sides of the Rio Grande.   At the time of her death, she owned more than a million acres of land.

fdrlibrary:

Happy 130th birthday Eleanor Roosevelt!

latimes:

The 2014 Nobel Peace Prize is shared by Pakistani girls education activist Malala Yousafzai and Indian children’s rights activist Kailash Satyarthi, the Nobel committee has announced. At 17, Yousafzai is the youngest winner in history.
Photo: Malala Yousafzai. Credit: Susan Walsh / Associated Press

latimes:

The 2014 Nobel Peace Prize is shared by Pakistani girls education activist Malala Yousafzai and Indian children’s rights activist Kailash Satyarthi, the Nobel committee has announced. At 17, Yousafzai is the youngest winner in history.

Photo: Malala Yousafzai. Credit: Susan Walsh / Associated Press

Frida Kahlo standing next to an agave plant during a photo shoot for Vogue magazine, 1937.

Frida Kahlo standing next to an agave plant during a photo shoot for Vogue magazine, 1937.

(Source: loc.gov)

Manuela Pedraza (Manuela la Tucumanesa) circa 1806
Art by Lucía Robledo (facebook, tumblr)
Manuela fought in the reconquest of Buenos Aires after the British invasion of the Río de la Plata.  On August 11, 1806, her husband was killed in battle by a British solider.  Manuela avenged her husband’s death and killed the solider who had shot him.  For her bravery, Manuela was granted the rank of alférez.

Manuela Pedraza (Manuela la Tucumanesa) circa 1806

Art by Lucía Robledo (facebook, tumblr)

Manuela fought in the reconquest of Buenos Aires after the British invasion of the Río de la Plata.  On August 11, 1806, her husband was killed in battle by a British solider.  Manuela avenged her husband’s death and killed the solider who had shot him.  For her bravery, Manuela was granted the rank of alférez.

Matilde Montoya
Art by Marci (tumblr)
Matilde completed her basic education at the age of 12 and her mother encouraged her to become a midwife.  By the age of 18, Matilde was a trained midwife practicing in the city of Puebla, Mexico.  However, she struggled to grow her practice as the local newspapers attacked her professionalism and accused her of being a Protestant Freemason. 
Matilde wanted to continue her studies and become a doctor, but she faced opposition from sexist authorities.  Although there were opportunities for women to study medicine in the US, Matilde wished to remain in Mexico.  With the support of President Porfirio Díaz, she completed her high school education (very unusual for a Mexican girl at that time) and enrolled in medical school in 1880.  The existence of a female medical student was so unusual that the Mexican press regularly reported on Matilde’s progress, including her midtem exam results.  Her achievements in medical school strengthen support to create further educational opportunities for girls.  Matilde graduated medical school in 1887 as a surgeon and obstetrician.   Porfirio Díaz and his wife Carmen appeared at her graduation to officially congratulate her. 

Although Matilde is considered the first Mexican female physician, there are mentions of an earlier female student named Zenaida Ucounkoff in 1877.

Matilde Montoya

Art by Marci (tumblr)

Matilde completed her basic education at the age of 12 and her mother encouraged her to become a midwife.  By the age of 18, Matilde was a trained midwife practicing in the city of Puebla, Mexico.  However, she struggled to grow her practice as the local newspapers attacked her professionalism and accused her of being a Protestant Freemason. 

Matilde wanted to continue her studies and become a doctor, but she faced opposition from sexist authorities.  Although there were opportunities for women to study medicine in the US, Matilde wished to remain in Mexico.  With the support of President Porfirio Díaz, she completed her high school education (very unusual for a Mexican girl at that time) and enrolled in medical school in 1880.  The existence of a female medical student was so unusual that the Mexican press regularly reported on Matilde’s progress, including her midtem exam results.  Her achievements in medical school strengthen support to create further educational opportunities for girls.  Matilde graduated medical school in 1887 as a surgeon and obstetrician.   Porfirio Díaz and his wife Carmen appeared at her graduation to officially congratulate her. 

Although Matilde is considered the first Mexican female physician, there are mentions of an earlier female student named Zenaida Ucounkoff in 1877.

Jovita Idár (1885-1946)
Art by Best Bitter Comics (tumblr, twitter)
Jovita began her career as a teacher in Laredo in 1903.  Frustrated by the lack of resources provided to the school, she quit teaching and began writing for her father’s newspaper, La Crónica.  Jovita’s writing focused on social justice issues, particularly the economic and structural challenges faced by poor Mexican Americans. 
When her family organized the First Mexican Congress in 1911, Jovita spearheaded the women’s contingent. After the conference, Jovita helped found the League of Mexican Women (La Liga Femenil Mexicanista) which provided free education to Tejano children.
The Idárs supported the Mexican Revolution and in 1913 Jovita travelled south to help the revolutionaries.  She served in Mexico with La Cruz Blanca (the White Cross) caring for the wounded.
In 1917, Jovita married and moved to San Antonio.  She remained active in social justice causes for the rest of her life.

Jovita Idár (1885-1946)

Art by Best Bitter Comics (tumblr, twitter)

Jovita began her career as a teacher in Laredo in 1903.  Frustrated by the lack of resources provided to the school, she quit teaching and began writing for her father’s newspaper, La Crónica.  Jovita’s writing focused on social justice issues, particularly the economic and structural challenges faced by poor Mexican Americans. 

When her family organized the First Mexican Congress in 1911, Jovita spearheaded the women’s contingent. After the conference, Jovita helped found the League of Mexican Women (La Liga Femenil Mexicanista) which provided free education to Tejano children.

The Idárs supported the Mexican Revolution and in 1913 Jovita travelled south to help the revolutionaries.  She served in Mexico with La Cruz Blanca (the White Cross) caring for the wounded.

In 1917, Jovita married and moved to San Antonio.  She remained active in social justice causes for the rest of her life.

broadcastarchive-umd:

This Is the First Weekend in America With No Saturday Morning Cartoons:


Saturday morning American broadcast TV was once animation’s home field. Filling a cereal bowl with artificially colored sugar pebbles and staring at the tube was every kid’s weekend plan. Not any more: For the first time in 50-plus years, you won’t find any animation on broadcast this morning. It’s the end of an era…

broadcastarchive-umd:

This Is the First Weekend in America With No Saturday Morning Cartoons:

Saturday morning American broadcast TV was once animation’s home field. Filling a cereal bowl with artificially colored sugar pebbles and staring at the tube was every kid’s weekend plan. Not any more: For the first time in 50-plus years, you won’t find any animation on broadcast this morning. It’s the end of an era…

Petrona Rosende (1787-1862)
Art by Snitchhazel570 (tumblr)
Petrona is considered the first female journalist in Argentina.  Between November 1830 and January 1831 she published eighteen editions of a feminist newspaper called La Aljaba (The Quiver).

Petrona Rosende (1787-1862)

Art by Snitchhazel570 (tumblr)

Petrona is considered the first female journalist in Argentina.  Between November 1830 and January 1831 she published eighteen editions of a feminist newspaper called La Aljaba (The Quiver).

Josefa Joaquina Sánchez (1765-1813)
Art by Taneisha (tumblr)
Josefa and her husband José María España were involved in La Conspiración de Gual y España, the first attempt to establish Venezuela as an independent country.  During this period, Joesfa sewed the first Venezuelan flag.  She also transcribed documents for the revolutionaries.
Josefa, José María, and the other conspirators were unsuccessful in their attempts to overthrow Spanish colonialism.  José María was killed and Josefa was imprisoned for eight years.  Josefa was released from prison in 1808 and banished to Cumaná with her nine children.  Despite Josefa’s pleading, her children were denied the right to attend university.  Josefa died before Venezuela achieved independence.   

Josefa Joaquina Sánchez (1765-1813)

Art by Taneisha (tumblr)

Josefa and her husband José María España were involved in La Conspiración de Gual y España, the first attempt to establish Venezuela as an independent country.  During this period, Joesfa sewed the first Venezuelan flag.  She also transcribed documents for the revolutionaries.

Josefa, José María, and the other conspirators were unsuccessful in their attempts to overthrow Spanish colonialism.  José María was killed and Josefa was imprisoned for eight years.  Josefa was released from prison in 1808 and banished to Cumaná with her nine children.  Despite Josefa’s pleading, her children were denied the right to attend university.  Josefa died before Venezuela achieved independence.   

Ana Néri
Art by Pale Yellow Daisy (tumblr)
Ana is considered the first Brazilian nurse.  When the Paraguayan War broke out and her three sons were called to serve, Ana volunteered as a nurse for the Triple Alliance.  For the first time in her life, Ana left her home province of Bahia to work in hospitals in Brazil, Argentina, and Paraguay.  She used her own wealth to help fund medical services and adopted four orphans.
After the war, Ana was given civilian honors and a government pension.  When the first Brazilian nursing school was founded in 1929, it was named in her honor.

Ana Néri

Art by Pale Yellow Daisy (tumblr)

Ana is considered the first Brazilian nurse.  When the Paraguayan War broke out and her three sons were called to serve, Ana volunteered as a nurse for the Triple Alliance.  For the first time in her life, Ana left her home province of Bahia to work in hospitals in Brazil, Argentina, and Paraguay.  She used her own wealth to help fund medical services and adopted four orphans.

After the war, Ana was given civilian honors and a government pension.  When the first Brazilian nursing school was founded in 1929, it was named in her honor.