The award is named after Pura Belpré, the first Latina librarian at the New York Public Library. The Pura Belpré Award, established in 1996, is presented annually to a Latino/Latina writer and illustrator whose work best portrays, affirms, and celebrates the Latino cultural experience in an outstanding work of literature for children and youth

Great list for parents, librarians, and educators.

Pura Belpré was born in Puetro Rico around the turn of the century.  In 1921, she joined the staff of the New York Public Library where she pioneered library outreach to the Latino community.  She was the first Puetro Rican employed by the New York City Public Library.  Working at the 110th Street and 115th Street branches, Pura instituted bilingual story hours and made the local library a cultural resource for the Latino community in Spanish Harlem.  She also wrote stories for children.

Chilean women vote in a municipal election, 1945.
Chile granted women the right to vote in municipal elections in 1931.  Chilean women achieved full suffrage in 1949.

Chilean women vote in a municipal election, 1945.

Chile granted women the right to vote in municipal elections in 1931.  Chilean women achieved full suffrage in 1949.

Margot Taule
Art by General 01 (tumblr)
The first woman to qualify as an architect or engineer in the Dominican Republic. 

Margot Taule

Art by General 01 (tumblr)

The first woman to qualify as an architect or engineer in the Dominican Republic. 

Hispanic Heritage Month

September 15 - October 15

Images from past posts: Juana BrionesJuana Azurduy de Padilla / Dolores Elizabeth “Lola” Chávez de Armijo / Manuela Beltrán

First female doctor by country?

Making a complete list is surprisingly difficult, considering that this information is probably known locally.  Below is an incomplete list by country.  

If you can add to the list, please use the answer function to write the woman’s name and country.  

Canada: Jennie Trout/Emily Stowe

Colombia: Anna Galvis Hotz

Ecuador: Matilde Hidalgo de Procel 

Egypt: Merit-Ptah 

Germany: Dorothea Erxleben

France: Madeleine Brès, but pre-modern women such as Magistra Hersend also practiced medicine.

Italy: Unknown, women qualified as physicians in the Middle Ages 12

India: Anandi Gopal Joshi, followed closely by Kadambini Ganguly

Korea: Jang Geum 

Peru: Laura Rodriguez Dulanto 

Philippines: Honoria Acosta-Sison

Russia: Nadezhda Suslova

Sweden: Lovisa Årberg

UK: Elizabeth Garrett Anderson

USA: Elizabeth Blackwell

usnatarchives:

"Jenny on the Job" was a series of posters issued by the Public Health Services in 1943 created by artist Kula Robbins. This specific poster is titled "Jenny on the Job - Wears styles designed for victory", depicting what women working in the factories and around machines were expected to wear. In today’s Pieces of History post, you can read more about how women’s pivotal role in the workforce during WWII greatly influence the fashion trends of the decade. National Archives Identifier: 514684.

usnatarchives:

"Jenny on the Job" was a series of posters issued by the Public Health Services in 1943 created by artist Kula Robbins. This specific poster is titled "Jenny on the Job - Wears styles designed for victory", depicting what women working in the factories and around machines were expected to wear. In today’s Pieces of History post, you can read more about how women’s pivotal role in the workforce during WWII greatly influence the fashion trends of the decade. National Archives Identifier: 514684.

operationfailure:

My friend Maggie, at the young age of 34, just found out she has a twin, and now it’s up to all of us to help her find them!
I love a mystery!
Please share this photo!

operationfailure:

My friend Maggie, at the young age of 34, just found out she has a twin, and now it’s up to all of us to help her find them!

I love a mystery!

Please share this photo!

Native American women from history?

Suggestions welcome, just keep in mind this is a history blog so dead women are strongly preferred.  

All Cool Native American Chicks from History posts

And that’s all for the Cool Medieval Chicks from History

You can see all the medieval posts here.

And all the Draw a Cool Chick from History posts here.

Bridget of Sweden (1303-1373)
Art by Anonymous
Bridget was the daughter of a prominent and wealthy Swedish family.  She married at age 14 and bore eight children, one of whom became St. Catherine of Vadstena.  As a wife and mother, Bridget was known for her charity and compassion.  After the death of her husband in 1344, she took the veil and founded the Bridgettine order of nuns and monks.  As shown above, the Bridgettine sisters wear a headdress called the “Crown of the Five Holy Wounds” with five red stones to symbolize the Five Wounds of Christ on the Cross.
Bridget left Sweden in 1349 to obtain Papal approval for her order.  She spent most of the rest of her life in Rome where she became known for her good works.  In the last year of her life, she went on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land.  Bridget died in 1373 in Rome, she never returned to Sweden.

Bridget is the patron saint of Sweden and one of six patron saints of Europe.  Her feast day is July 23.

Bridget of Sweden (1303-1373)

Art by Anonymous

Bridget was the daughter of a prominent and wealthy Swedish family.  She married at age 14 and bore eight children, one of whom became St. Catherine of Vadstena.  As a wife and mother, Bridget was known for her charity and compassion.  After the death of her husband in 1344, she took the veil and founded the Bridgettine order of nuns and monks.  As shown above, the Bridgettine sisters wear a headdress called the “Crown of the Five Holy Wounds” with five red stones to symbolize the Five Wounds of Christ on the Cross.

Bridget left Sweden in 1349 to obtain Papal approval for her order.  She spent most of the rest of her life in Rome where she became known for her good works.  In the last year of her life, she went on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land.  Bridget died in 1373 in Rome, she never returned to Sweden.

Bridget is the patron saint of Sweden and one of six patron saints of Europe.  Her feast day is July 23.

Kassia, 9th century
Art by Ewnor (tumblr)
Kassia is the earliest known female composer with surviving works.  Her forty-nine extant hymns can be found in the liturgical books of the Eastern Orthodox Church.  Her most famous work, the Hymn of Kassiani, is sung every Holy Wednesday in the Orthodox Church.  Legend states the hymn was inspired by Kassia’s rejection of Byzantine Emperor Theophilos’s hand in marriage when she was a young woman.   
Listen to the Hymn of Kassiani in English here.

Kassia, 9th century

Art by Ewnor (tumblr)

Kassia is the earliest known female composer with surviving works.  Her forty-nine extant hymns can be found in the liturgical books of the Eastern Orthodox Church.  Her most famous work, the Hymn of Kassiani, is sung every Holy Wednesday in the Orthodox Church.  Legend states the hymn was inspired by Kassia’s rejection of Byzantine Emperor Theophilos’s hand in marriage when she was a young woman.   

Listen to the Hymn of Kassiani in English here.

On Joan Rivers

So far, two people have messaged to complain about the Joan Rivers posts.  There will probably be more, though it is unnecessary.

Cool Chicks from History is not reserved for perfect people.  If it was, there would be no one here.

Joan Rivers broke ground for female entertainers.  That doesn’t erase the problematic things she said, but it does make her noteworthy.  You don’t have to like her to recognize that she paved the way for other women.

newyorker:

Michael Schulman remembers Joan Rivers:

“Everyone who called her the Queen of Mean was missing the point: life is what’s mean, and she was here to let us know how funny that is.”

Credit Photograph Ruth Fremson / The New York Times / Redux  

The linked piece is short and worth reading.

newyorker:

Michael Schulman remembers Joan Rivers:

“Everyone who called her the Queen of Mean was missing the point: life is what’s mean, and she was here to let us know how funny that is.”

Credit Photograph Ruth Fremson / The New York Times / Redux

The linked piece is short and worth reading.

(Source: newyorker.com)

kateoplis:

"I think anyone who’s perfectly happy isn’t particularly funny."
Joan Rivers, 1933-2014

kateoplis:

"I think anyone who’s perfectly happy isn’t particularly funny."

Joan Rivers, 1933-2014

fordlibrarymuseum:

The First Lady’s First Press Conference
A week after the President gave his first press conference Betty Ford held one of her own. She fielded questions in the State Dining Room for 25 minutes on September 4, 1974. Although she had interacted informally with the press since entering the White House, Mrs. Ford took a step many former First Ladies had not by making herself available to the media in an official press conference. Around 150 reporters and photographers attended the session. During the press conference Mrs. Ford answered questions about her family’s transition to the White House, the impact of the economy on her family’s budget, and the possibility of President Ford running in the 1976 election. She spoke openly on several topics that would come up throughout the administration, including her support of the Equal Rights Amendment and women’s engagement in civic affairs. “I think that by becoming very active in politics, which I deeply encourage, that they will play a great role in the future of our country,” she said. Reporters asked her about her role as First Lady as well. Mrs. Ford expressed her interest in supporting the arts, particularly in education, and working with underprivileged and retarded children. She also responded to a question regarding the kind of “footprint” she wanted to make during her time in the White House: “I would like to be remembered in a very kind way; also as a constructive wife of a President. I do not expect to come anywhere near living up to those First Ladies who have gone before me. They have all done a great job, and I admire them a great deal and it is only my ambition to come close to them.”

fordlibrarymuseum:

The First Lady’s First Press Conference

A week after the President gave his first press conference Betty Ford held one of her own. She fielded questions in the State Dining Room for 25 minutes on September 4, 1974.

Although she had interacted informally with the press since entering the White House, Mrs. Ford took a step many former First Ladies had not by making herself available to the media in an official press conference. Around 150 reporters and photographers attended the session.

During the press conference Mrs. Ford answered questions about her family’s transition to the White House, the impact of the economy on her family’s budget, and the possibility of President Ford running in the 1976 election. She spoke openly on several topics that would come up throughout the administration, including her support of the Equal Rights Amendment and women’s engagement in civic affairs. “I think that by becoming very active in politics, which I deeply encourage, that they will play a great role in the future of our country,” she said.

Reporters asked her about her role as First Lady as well. Mrs. Ford expressed her interest in supporting the arts, particularly in education, and working with underprivileged and retarded children. She also responded to a question regarding the kind of “footprint” she wanted to make during her time in the White House: “I would like to be remembered in a very kind way; also as a constructive wife of a President. I do not expect to come anywhere near living up to those First Ladies who have gone before me. They have all done a great job, and I admire them a great deal and it is only my ambition to come close to them.”