Tibors de Sarenom, 12th century
Art by Michelle Dee (tumblr, deviant art)
Tibors or Tiburge de Sarenom is the earliest know trobairitz or female troubadour.  Troubadours were medieval poet-musicians from Occitania, a region encompassing southern France as well as parts of Italy and Spain.  Troubadours composed secular ballads in Occitan, a Romance language native to the area.  Their poems could be intellectual, humorous, and even vulgar, but most focused on courtly love.
Many troubadours came from highborn families.  Tibors was the daughter of Guilhem d’Omelas and Tibors d’Aurenga, two nobles from southern France.  Her younger brother, Raimbaut d’Orange, was also a troubadour.  Tibors married twice and had three sons, one whom became a troubadour. 
Only a single stanza of Tibors work has survived:

Fair, sweet friend, I can truly tell you
I have never been without desire
since I met you and took you as a true lover,
nor has it happened that I lack the wish,
my fair sweet friend, to see you often,
nor has the season come when I repented,
nor has it happened, if you went off angry, 
nor that I knew joy until you had returned,
nor…
(Source: Songs of the Women Troubadours)

Tibors de Sarenom, 12th century

Art by Michelle Dee (tumblr, deviant art)

Tibors or Tiburge de Sarenom is the earliest know trobairitz or female troubadour.  Troubadours were medieval poet-musicians from Occitania, a region encompassing southern France as well as parts of Italy and Spain.  Troubadours composed secular ballads in Occitan, a Romance language native to the area.  Their poems could be intellectual, humorous, and even vulgar, but most focused on courtly love.

Many troubadours came from highborn families.  Tibors was the daughter of Guilhem d’Omelas and Tibors d’Aurenga, two nobles from southern France.  Her younger brother, Raimbaut d’Orange, was also a troubadour.  Tibors married twice and had three sons, one whom became a troubadour. 

Only a single stanza of Tibors work has survived:

Fair, sweet friend, I can truly tell you

I have never been without desire

since I met you and took you as a true lover,

nor has it happened that I lack the wish,

my fair sweet friend, to see you often,

nor has the season come when I repented,

nor has it happened, if you went off angry,

nor that I knew joy until you had returned,

nor…

(Source: Songs of the Women Troubadours)

vintageanchorbooks:

On this day in 1818, Emily Jane Brontë was born in Thornton, West Riding of Yorkshire, England — the fifth of the six Brontë children, three of whom will grow up to write fiction.“I have to remind myself to breathe — almost to remind my heart to beat!” ―Heathcliff from Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë

vintageanchorbooks:

On this day in 1818, Emily Jane Brontë was born in Thornton, West Riding of Yorkshire, England — the fifth of the six Brontë children, three of whom will grow up to write fiction.

“I have to remind myself to breathe — almost to remind my heart to beat!”
―Heathcliff from Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë

Thérèse Casgrain, feminist icon, quietly dropped as federal award namesake

Thérèse Casgrain, a feminist icon and Quebec heroine who died in 1981, has been quietly removed from a national honour, to be replaced by a volunteer award bearing the prime minister’s banner. (Source: CBC)

Petition: Bank of Canada: Add women from Canadian history to Canadian bank notes (Change.org)

Petition: Restore the Thérèse Casgrain Volunteer Award (Liberal Party)

iowawomensarchives:

Today - July 28, 2014 - is the 100th anniversary of the beginning of World War I. We’re marking the occasion by remembering Iowa women whose lives were shaped by the war.

Louise Liers, World War I nurse, by Christina Jensen

On June 28th, 1914, Austro-Hungarian Archduke Franz Ferdinand was assassinated in Sarajevo by Yugoslav nationalist Gavrilo Princip. One month later, war broke out across Europe between two alliance systems. Britain, France, Russia, and Italy comprised the Allied powers. Germany, Austria-Hungary, and the Ottoman Empire constituted the Central powers. As war raged abroad, the U.S. wrestled with the politics of neutrality and intervention. In April of 1917, President Wilson was granted a declaration of war by Congress. The United States thus officially entered the conflict alongside Allied forces.

One such woman was Clayton-native Louise Marie Liers (1887-1983), an obstetrics nurse who enrolled in the Red Cross and served in France as an Army nurse. 

Before her deployment, however, Liers was required by the American Red Cross to submit three letters “vouching for her loyalty as an American citizen.” All nurses, regardless of nationality, were similarly required to provide three non-familial references testifying to this effect. While questions of loyalty and subversion are exacerbated in any war, America’s domestic front was rife with tension driven by geography, class, and ethnicity that raised fears and stoked national debate in the years leading up to America’s engagement in the Great War.

Arriving in 1918, Liers was stationed in the French town of Nevers where she treated wounded soldiers.  During this time Liers wrote numerous letters home to her parents and brother describing her duties and conditions of life during the war.

In a letter to her brother, featured below, Liers described her journey to France from New York City, with stops in Liverpool and Southampton.

When Liers arrived in 1918, Nevers was only a few hours away from the Allied offensive line of the Western Front.  She was assigned to a camp that served patients with serious injuries and those who required long-term care.  Liers noted in a 1970 interview that, by the end of the war, as fewer patients with battle wounds arrived, her camp began to see patients with the “Asian flu,” also known as the 1918 influenza outbreak that infected 500 million people across the world by the end of the war.

In letters home, and in interviews given later, Liers described pleasant memories from her time in service, including pooling sugar rations with fellow nurses to make fudge for patients.  Nurses could apply for passes to leave camp and Liers was thus able to visit both Paris and Cannes.  In an interview Liers recalled that, serendipitously, she had requested in advance a leave-pass to travel into town for the 11th of November, 1918. To her surprise, that date turned out to be Armistice Day, and she was able to celebrate the end of the war with the citizens of Nevers.

Along with her cheerier memories, however, Liers’s papers also describe the difficulties of caregiving during war.  She described Nevers as a town “stripped of younger people” due to the great number of deaths accrued in the four years of war.  In later interviews Liers offered many accounts of the grim surroundings medical staff worked under, from cramped and poorly equipped conditions, to unhygienic supplies, such as bandages washed by locals in nearby rivers, which she remembered as “utterly ridiculous from a sanitary standpoint…they were these awful dressings. They weren’t even sterilized, there wasn’t time.”  Due to the harsh conditions and limited resources, nurses and doctors gained practical knowledge in the field. Liers recalled frustrating battles to treat maggot-infected wounds before the nurses realized that the maggots, in fact, were sometimes the best option to keep wounds clean from infection in a field hospital.

On a grimmer note, Liers wrote to her parents the following:

As I have told you before, the boys are wonderful- very helpful. When I see their horrible wounds or worse still their mustard gas burns or the gassed patients who will never again be able to do a whole days work- I lose every spark of sympathy for the beast who devised such tortures and called it warfare- last we were in Moulins when a train of children from the devastated districts came down-burned and gassed- and that was the most pitiful sight of all.

By the time the “final drive” was in motion, Base Hospital No. 14 was filled with patients to nearly double capacity, and doctors and nurses had to work by candlelight or single light bulb. Liers’ wartime service and reflections suggest a range of emotions and experiences had by women thrust into a brutal war, remembered for its different methods of warfare, inventive machinery, and attacks on civilian populations. 

Liers worked in France until 1920, and her correspondence with friends and family marks the change in routine brought on by the end of the war.  With more freedom to travel, Liers and friends toured throughout France, and like countless visitors before and after, Liers describes how enchanted she became with the country, from the excitement of Paris to the rural beauty of Provence.

Following the war, Liers returned to private practice in Chicago, and later Elkader, where she was regarded as a local institution unto herself, attending over 7,000 births by 1949.  She was beloved by her local community, which gifted her a new car in 1950 as a sign of gratitude upon her retirement.

Louise Lier’s World War I scrapbook and other items from the University of Iowa’s World War I collections will soon be available in Iowa Digital Library.

Want more? Visit the Iowa Women’s Archives! We’re open weekly Tuesday-Friday, 10:00am to noon and 1:00pm to 5:00pm.

A list of collections related to Iowa women and war can be found here.

ourpresidents:

Jacqueline Kennedy was born on this day in 1929, in Southhampton, New York.  She was named Jacqueline Lee Bouvier.  Her father, John, was a stockbroker on Wall Street whose family had come from France in the early 1800s. Her mother, Janet, had ancestors from Ireland and England. 
As a child, Jackie loved to read. Before she started school, she had read all the children’s books on her bookshelves. Her heroes were Mowgli from Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle Book, Robin Hood, Little Lord Fauntleroy’s grandfather, Scarlett O’Hara from Gone With the Wind, and the poet Byron.
Learn more about growing up as Jacqueline Kennedy from the JFK Library
Photo: Jacqueline Bouvier, 1935. Photograph by David Berne in the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston.

ourpresidents:

Jacqueline Kennedy was born on this day in 1929, in Southhampton, New York.  She was named Jacqueline Lee Bouvier.  Her father, John, was a stockbroker on Wall Street whose family had come from France in the early 1800s. Her mother, Janet, had ancestors from Ireland and England. 

As a child, Jackie loved to read. Before she started school, she had read all the children’s books on her bookshelves. Her heroes were Mowgli from Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle Book, Robin Hood, Little Lord Fauntleroy’s grandfather, Scarlett O’Hara from Gone With the Wind, and the poet Byron.

Learn more about growing up as Jacqueline Kennedy from the JFK Library

Photo: Jacqueline Bouvier, 1935. Photograph by David Berne in the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston.

funnyordie:

Mary Poppins Quits with Kristen Bell

Mary Poppins (Kristen Bell) is working for minimum wage, and really needs a raise.

digg:

Watch the Queen of England age through bank notes.

digg:

Watch the Queen of England age through bank notes.

Between the world wars, life partners Martha May Eliot and Ethel Collins Dunham taught at Yale’s medical school—and were pioneers in pediatrics.

hat tip to callmebackinfiveyears for the link.

Latina women from history?

Putting together a list for Hispanic Heritage month in the fall, suggestions welcome.  

Please don’t say Frida Kahlo, she’s wonderful but the only Latina from history anyone seems to know.  

wiscohisto:

Advertisement for Viterbo College, La Crosse, Wisconsin, 1967.

"We teach the usual things that young ladies go to school to learn — everything from art to nursing."

via: Past and Present: A Digital History of Wisconsin Independent Colleges and Universities

Apparently the “femininity” campaign was unsuccessful as Viterbo went co-ed in 1970.

wiscohisto:

Advertisement for Viterbo College, La Crosse, Wisconsin, 1967.

"We teach the usual things that young ladies go to school to learn — everything from art to nursing."

via: Past and Present: A Digital History of Wisconsin Independent Colleges and Universities

Apparently the “femininity” campaign was unsuccessful as Viterbo went co-ed in 1970.

todaysdocument:

Suffragettes Pardoned

Bastille Day spells prison for sixteen suffragettes who picketed the White House. Miss Julia Hurlbut of Morristown, New Jersey, leading the sixteen members of the National Womans Party who participated in the picketing demonstration in front of the White House, Washington, District of Columbia, July 14,1917, which led to their arrest. These sixteen women were sent to the workhouse at Occoquan, on July 17, 1917, upon their refusal to pay fines of $25 each, but were pardoned on July 19, 1917.

todaysdocument:

Suffragettes Pardoned

Bastille Day spells prison for sixteen suffragettes who picketed the White House. Miss Julia Hurlbut of Morristown, New Jersey, leading the sixteen members of the National Womans Party who participated in the picketing demonstration in front of the White House, Washington, District of Columbia, July 14,1917, which led to their arrest. These sixteen women were sent to the workhouse at Occoquan, on July 17, 1917, upon their refusal to pay fines of $25 each, but were pardoned on July 19, 1917.

(Source: research.archives.gov)

The National Literary Trust (UK) has scatter 50 book benches across London for the summer.  Click on the links below for the bench’s location and the name of the artist.

Above: Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf / How to Train Your Dragon by Cressida Cowell / Mary Poppins by P.L. Travers / The Railway Children by E. Nesbit / Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen / Bridget Jones’s Diary by Helen Fielding / Brick Lane by Monica AliHercule Poirot and the Greenshore Folly by Agatha Christie

nprbooks:

Image: South African novelist Nadine Gordimer poses during the 2006 Rome literature festival. (Tiziana Fabi/AFP/Getty Images)
Nadine Gordimer, a Nobel Prize-winning author famed for her portrayals of South Africa under apartheid, died Sunday, her family said in a statement. She was 90.
Gordimer was considered a modern literary genius, an important chronicler of the injustices of racial segregation. Three of her books were banned during apartheid.
"They showed how people were living here," Gordimer said in an NPR interview last year. “They showed what influences were shaping our lives. And they showed the many different reactions to it among different people here.”
More on Gordimer’s legacy here.

nprbooks:

Image: South African novelist Nadine Gordimer poses during the 2006 Rome literature festival. (Tiziana Fabi/AFP/Getty Images)

Nadine Gordimer, a Nobel Prize-winning author famed for her portrayals of South Africa under apartheid, died Sunday, her family said in a statement. She was 90.

Gordimer was considered a modern literary genius, an important chronicler of the injustices of racial segregation. Three of her books were banned during apartheid.

"They showed how people were living here," Gordimer said in an NPR interview last year. “They showed what influences were shaping our lives. And they showed the many different reactions to it among different people here.”

More on Gordimer’s legacy here.

ourmarathon:


A stark reminder of the chaos and confusion following the Marathon bombing. View more submitted text messages here. 

No story (or screenshot) is too small. Submit your own text messages, images, stories and more to our archive.

Reblogging to signal boost for those who might be interested.  Our Marathon, run by Northeastern University, is posting and collecting materials relating to the Boston Marathon Bombing.

ourmarathon:

A stark reminder of the chaos and confusion following the Marathon bombing. View more submitted text messages here

No story (or screenshot) is too small. Submit your own text messages, images, stories and more to our archive.

Reblogging to signal boost for those who might be interested.  Our Marathon, run by Northeastern University, is posting and collecting materials relating to the Boston Marathon Bombing.

pogphotoarchives:

Catharine C. Critcher, the only woman admitted to the Taos Society of Artists, painting a portrait, New Mexico
Date: circa 1925-1927Negative Number 020452

pogphotoarchives:

Catharine C. Critcher, the only woman admitted to the Taos Society of Artists, painting a portrait, New Mexico

Date: circa 1925-1927
Negative Number 020452