Poems?

April is National Poetry Month so Cool Chicks from History will be posting some poems.

Any suggestions of tumblr friendly (aka short) poems pre 1970 or so?  Written by women, obvs.

Hudson Valley, NY

Application due April 11

To My Dear and Loving Husband - Anne Bradstreet

If ever two were one, then surely we.
If ever man were loved by wife, then thee;
If ever wife was happy in a man,
Compare with me ye women if you can.
I prize thy love more than whole mines of gold,
Or all the riches that the East doth hold.
My love is such that rivers cannot quench,
Nor ought but love from thee give recompense.
Thy love is such I can no way repay;
The heavens reward thee manifold, I pray.
Then while we live, in love let’s so persever,
That when we live no more we may live ever.

*     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *

Anne Bradstreet (c. 1612-1672) was among the first Puritan settlers to immigrate to the New World.  She was the first published poet and first published female writer from British North America.  Her descendants include Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sarah Orne Jewett, and John Kerry.  

usnatarchivesexhibits:

Letter to President William McKinley from Annie Oakley in which she offers the services of a company of fifty lady American sharpshooters who would provide their own arms and ammunition, to the government should war break out with Spain., 04/05/1898 - 04/05/1898
Item from Records of the Adjutant General’s Office. (03/04/1907 - 09/18/1947)
Don’t forget—the National Archives’ new exhibition “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” opens March 21, 2014.
Source: http://go.usa.gov/DykQ

usnatarchivesexhibits:

Letter to President William McKinley from Annie Oakley in which she offers the services of a company of fifty lady American sharpshooters who would provide their own arms and ammunition, to the government should war break out with Spain., 04/05/1898 - 04/05/1898

Item from Records of the Adjutant General’s Office. (03/04/1907 - 09/18/1947)

Don’t forget—the National Archives’ new exhibition “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” opens March 21, 2014.

Source: http://go.usa.gov/DykQ

(Source: research.archives.gov)

iowaarchaeology:

We’ll be featuring a different Discovery Trunk every Thursday. There are few more to come, and several new ones in development!
Fort Atkinson and the Neutral Ground, 1840-1849
http://discover.research.uiowa.edu/fort-atkinson-and-neutral-ground-1840-1849
Resources in this Discovery Trunk highlight the culture and interaction of the groups associated with the occupation of Fort Atkinson and the Neutral Ground in northeastern Iowa in the 1840s: the soldiers, the Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) Indians, and the pioneer settlers. Contents include a sampling of artifacts used by each of these groups, lessons and activities, books, period images, and a DVD about archaeological excavations at the fort. Of special interest are a journal written by a pioneer girl who lived in the area and a book detailing the childhood of a Ho-Chunk girl of about the same time period. The lessons and activities are designed to be compatible with social studies and history units on Iowa’s Peoples, Native People of Iowa, and the Westward Movement which are taught in the elementary grades in Iowa schools. The lessons also have strong science, language arts, and technology components.
*******************************************************************************
Did you know that our Discovery Trunks are available to educators across Iowa? Because of recent grants, there is now NO CHARGE for checking them out! (return shipping charges may apply)
You can browse the trunks on the Dare to Discover website and reserve them using the online form.

Another one for any Iowa teachers out there.

iowaarchaeology:

We’ll be featuring a different Discovery Trunk every Thursday. There are few more to come, and several new ones in development!

Fort Atkinson and the Neutral Ground, 1840-1849

http://discover.research.uiowa.edu/fort-atkinson-and-neutral-ground-1840-1849

Resources in this Discovery Trunk highlight the culture and interaction of the groups associated with the occupation of Fort Atkinson and the Neutral Ground in northeastern Iowa in the 1840s: the soldiers, the Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) Indians, and the pioneer settlers. Contents include a sampling of artifacts used by each of these groups, lessons and activities, books, period images, and a DVD about archaeological excavations at the fort. Of special interest are a journal written by a pioneer girl who lived in the area and a book detailing the childhood of a Ho-Chunk girl of about the same time period. The lessons and activities are designed to be compatible with social studies and history units on Iowa’s Peoples, Native People of Iowa, and the Westward Movement which are taught in the elementary grades in Iowa schools. The lessons also have strong science, language arts, and technology components.

*******************************************************************************

Did you know that our Discovery Trunks are available to educators across Iowa? Because of recent grants, there is now NO CHARGE for checking them out! (return shipping charges may apply)

You can browse the trunks on the Dare to Discover website and reserve them using the online form.

Another one for any Iowa teachers out there.

pogphotoarchives:

Professional cowgirl and runner up in the world championship relay race, Barbara Inez “Tad” Lucas of Cody, NebraskaDate: 1924 - 1926?Negative Number HP.1999.06.5

pogphotoarchives:

Professional cowgirl and runner up in the world championship relay race, Barbara Inez “Tad” Lucas of Cody, Nebraska

Date: 1924 - 1926?
Negative Number HP.1999.06.5

lauriehalseanderson:

RAINN help victims of sexual violence speak up and heal. Please donate $15 so they can keep doing their important work. Give $25 and get a signed poster, $75 will get you a signed copy of SPEAK, and if you can give $1000, I’ll Skype in and talk to you (and friends, if you want), about writing and pretty much anything you want.
Thank you!

Cool Chicks from History is Changing Focus

americamcbaldeaglefreedompants:

coolchicksfromhistory:

No longer will Cool Chicks from History focus on the accomplishments of awesome historical women. Today this tumblr will shift focus to highlight white men.

White men are a massively underrepresented group in history books.  Too long their accomplishments have gone unheralded.  This must change and change starts today.

Read More

I could not agree more with this decision. For too long we have ignored the great accomplishments of white men. For example Eleanor Roosevelt. All anyone ever blabs about is how she used her national presence to campaign for equality for everyone and how great she was blah blah blahhhh. But did you know her husband WAS A PRESIDENT??? A PRESIDENT WHO LED THIS COUNTRY DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR. Yea I bet they didn’t teach that to you in that feminist dominated school of yours. I bet you didn’t even know she was married. Ever heard of Albert Einstein? Probably not because your teacher was too busy forcing Marie Curie and Jane Goodall down your throat. Wake up people! 

Thank you for the support!

Cool Chicks from History is Changing Focus

No longer will Cool Chicks from History focus on the accomplishments of awesome historical women. Today this tumblr will shift focus to highlight white men.

White men are a massively underrepresented group in history books.  Too long their accomplishments have gone unheralded.  This must change and change starts today.

Read More

houghtonlib:

Photograph of the home of Sarah Orne Jewett.
MS Am 1743.26 (16)
Houghton Library, Harvard University

houghtonlib:

Photograph of the home of Sarah Orne Jewett.

MS Am 1743.26 (16)

Houghton Library, Harvard University

Follow Friday: Museums, Historic Sites, Etc. on Tumblr

All more or less history related, general location in parenthesis if it isn’t obvious.  Library special collections included, if you’re looking for your local public library, try the Lifeguard Librarian’s list.  Crazy long list after the jump.

Read More

statelibrarynsw:

Caroline Chisholm, philanthropist and social activist, remembered as the “emigrant’s friend”, died on 25 March 1877.
She travelled to Australia with her husband in 1838 and settled in Sydney, where she tirelessly assisted young women to find employment and subsequently established the Female Immigrant’s Home. 
Caroline Chisholm also founded the Family Colonization Loan Society a scheme which assisted free migration of families, helping them find a living in country areas, and she worked toward establishing a policy of migration for Australia. More details of her life and work are available in the Australian Dictionary of Biography
This painting of Caroline Chisholm by A. C. Hayter from 1852 is held by the State Library of New South Wales. 

statelibrarynsw:

Caroline Chisholm, philanthropist and social activist, remembered as the “emigrant’s friend”, died on 25 March 1877.

She travelled to Australia with her husband in 1838 and settled in Sydney, where she tirelessly assisted young women to find employment and subsequently established the Female Immigrant’s Home. 

Caroline Chisholm also founded the Family Colonization Loan Society a scheme which assisted free migration of families, helping them find a living in country areas, and she worked toward establishing a policy of migration for Australia. More details of her life and work are available in the Australian Dictionary of Biography

This painting of Caroline Chisholm by A. C. Hayter from 1852 is held by the State Library of New South Wales. 

wiscohisto:

Women’s baseball team, Babcock, Wisconsin, ca. 1910-1930.
via: The Taylor Brothers Photographs, University of Wisconsin - LaCrosse Murphy Library, by way of University of Wisconsin Digital Collections

wiscohisto:

Women’s baseball team, Babcock, Wisconsin, ca. 1910-1930.

via: The Taylor Brothers Photographs, University of Wisconsin - LaCrosse Murphy Library, by way of University of Wisconsin Digital Collections

iowawomensarchives:

"Today’s Girls Love Pink Bows as Playthings, but These Shoot" claims a recent New York Times article about archery’s current pop culture moment, thanks to the Hunger Games trilogy and Disney’s “Brave.” But as these 1940s images from the University of Iowa suggest, the latest resurgence is part of a longer tradition of female participation in the sport:

[Archery] had been a popular female sport for many centuries, with such famous archers as Anne Boleyn and Elizabeth I. Women’s participation in archery did not breech any standards of propriety for young students. Archery was elegant and graceful, and women could participate outdoors, while corseted and dressed fashionably, and without having to wear the shocking bloomers… [Student experimentation] in competitive, individual sports such as fencing, archery, tennis, golf, and bicycling… were important for paving the way to more competitive and vigorous women’s sports. — Bright Epoch: Women and Coeducation in the American West by Andrea G. Radke-Moss

Iowa Digital Library: Archery series, University of Iowa Physical Education for Women digital collection

Iowa Women’s Archives: Guide to the University of Iowa Department of Physical Education for Women Records, 1900-2006

View all Women’s History Wednesday posts