ourpresidents:

Eleanor Roosevelt carries her bags across the tarmac at New York City’s LaGuardia Airport in 1960.
-from the FDR Library

ourpresidents:

Eleanor Roosevelt carries her bags across the tarmac at New York City’s LaGuardia Airport in 1960.

-from the FDR Library

(Source: facebook.com)

Cool Chicks from History Missing from Wikipedia

For any Wikipedia editors out there (or any students required to edit for school): a list of women missing from Wikipedia.

Cool Chicks from History posts provided as a starting point, but they’re not up to Wikipedia standards.

Virginia M. Alexander has no Wikipedia page, but her sister in law does.  Cool Chicks from History post with a NLM link. Virginia M. Alexander’s Wikipedia page.

Edna Beard has no Wikipedia page.  VT Women’s History Project entry.  Cool Chicks from History post. Edna Beard’s Wikipedia page.

Jane Walker Burleson has no Wikipedia page.  Cool Chicks from History post with lots of sources.  Jane Walker Burleson’s Wikipedia page

Gwen Cherry has no Wikipedia page, but her house is mentioned on the West Palm Beach page.  Cool Chicks from History post. Gwen Cherry’s Wikipedia page.

Cora Dow has no Wikipedia page, but was important enough in her day for Howard Taft to eulogize her.  Cool Chicks from History post. Cora’s Wikipedia page.

Lucy Tayiah Eads has no Wikipedia page, but she is briefly mention on the Kaw People page.  Cool Chicks from History Post. Lucy’s Wikipedia page.

Ruth Elder lacks a Wikipedia page, despite a career in both film and aviation.  Cool Chicks from History post. Ruth’s Wikipedia page.

Verna Erikson doesn’t have a Wikipedia page.  Cool Chicks from History post. Verna’s Wikipedia page.

Mary Grizzle has no Wikipedia page, but she is mentioned on the FL Women’s Hall of Fame page.  Cool Chicks from History post. Mary’s Wikipedia page.

Lis Hartel’s entry needs sources in English.  Cool Chicks from History post. Lis Hartel’s Wikipedia page.

Sharon Hedrick lacks a Wikipedia page despite several noteworthy firsts in wheelchair sports.  Cool Chicks from History post. Update: Tumblr user strawmeadow created a page for Sharon

Ella Hugginson has no Wikipedia entry, but she is listed as a “notable contributor” in the West Shore Magazine entry.  Cool Chicks from History post.

Elsie Hill is mentioned on her husband’s entry, but lacks her own entry. Cool Chicks from History post.   Elsie’s Wikipedia page.

Anesia Pinheiro Machado has no entry in English, but she does have one in Portuguese.  She is also mentioned on the Brazilian stamps page.  Cool Chicks from History post. Anesia’s Wikipedia page.

Petrona Viera has only a stub.  Cool Chicks from History post. Updated Wikipedia page.

Princess Stephanie of Belgium has a Wikipedia page, but it fails to mention that was an inventor.  Cool Chicks from History post with link to a NYT article about her patent.

List of women firsts could use some serious work, such as listing all the the first female Nobel Prize winners.

Many International Women of Courage Award winners lack Wikipedia pages.

Suffrage straw ride in Yonkers, New York on August 30, 1913.
The suffragettes were on their way to city hall to give the mayor tickets to their upcoming event.

Suffrage straw ride in Yonkers, New York on August 30, 1913.

The suffragettes were on their way to city hall to give the mayor tickets to their upcoming event.

Women at the March on Washington

August 28, 1963

Images via The National Archives and The Library of Congress: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8.

motherjones:

For the 50th anniversary of the historic civil rights rally, an ode to the women who helped it succeed—and got little recognition for it.
(Steve Schapiro/Corbis)

motherjones:

For the 50th anniversary of the historic civil rights rally, an ode to the women who helped it succeed—and got little recognition for it.

(Steve Schapiro/Corbis)

In honor of the US Open… schoolgirls playing tennis circa 1900.  
Explore PA History has some interesting information about St. Xavier’s Academy and its brother school, St. Vincent Preparatory School for Boys:

Especially after mid-decade, when the devastating Irish Potato Famine propelled an the exodus of nearly two million Catholics to American shores, a smoldering nativist resentment boiled over into violent street rioting in places like Philadelphia, New York, and Boston. New political movements dedicated themselves to defending America from the imagined foreign threat. In Pennsylvania and elsewhere an expanding network of Catholic parochial schools became a special target of nativist protest.The history of St. Xavier’s Academy and Convent is inextricably bound to the story of an immigrant Catholic Church and the growth of parochial education in nineteenth-century Pennsylvania. Faced with a growing immigrant population, and the building anti-Catholic reaction, Church leaders believed strong institutions dedicated to defending and disseminating the faith were essential to the survival of Catholicism in America. Like the parish church, parochial schools staffed by nuns and priests were an important ingredient in maintaining a Catholic culture in United States.
Just as the Famine was taking hold in Ireland, Pittsburgh’s Catholic Bishop Michael O’Connor invited a teaching order of nuns from Dublin to open a school in Westmoreland County. Founded by Catherine McAuley in 1831, the first Sisters of Mercy arrived in the United States in 1843. The Mercies, as they were called, were typical of women religious orders that dedicated their lives to teaching, hospital work, and other charitable causes.
…the St. Xavier nuns taught their students “first what is necessary, then what is useful, and finally what is beautiful.”
(full text)

In honor of the US Open… schoolgirls playing tennis circa 1900.  

Explore PA History has some interesting information about St. Xavier’s Academy and its brother school, St. Vincent Preparatory School for Boys:

Especially after mid-decade, when the devastating Irish Potato Famine propelled an the exodus of nearly two million Catholics to American shores, a smoldering nativist resentment boiled over into violent street rioting in places like Philadelphia, New York, and Boston. New political movements dedicated themselves to defending America from the imagined foreign threat. In Pennsylvania and elsewhere an expanding network of Catholic parochial schools became a special target of nativist protest.

The history of St. Xavier’s Academy and Convent is inextricably bound to the story of an immigrant Catholic Church and the growth of parochial education in nineteenth-century Pennsylvania. Faced with a growing immigrant population, and the building anti-Catholic reaction, Church leaders believed strong institutions dedicated to defending and disseminating the faith were essential to the survival of Catholicism in America. Like the parish church, parochial schools staffed by nuns and priests were an important ingredient in maintaining a Catholic culture in United States.

Just as the Famine was taking hold in Ireland, Pittsburgh’s Catholic Bishop Michael O’Connor invited a teaching order of nuns from Dublin to open a school in Westmoreland County. Founded by Catherine McAuley in 1831, the first Sisters of Mercy arrived in the United States in 1843. The Mercies, as they were called, were typical of women religious orders that dedicated their lives to teaching, hospital work, and other charitable causes.

the St. Xavier nuns taught their students “first what is necessary, then what is useful, and finally what is beautiful.”

(full text)

jfkmemories:

I was in the tenth grade, at a segregated school, to which I was bussed after passing by many white schools, one of which was within walking distance of my home.

Anyway, at the time I heard the news, there were so many students in the hallway, as we were returning from a program that was held in…

Cool project from AARP

uspsstamps:

It’s Women’s Equality Day. On this day in 1920, the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, which granted women the right to vote, went into effect. Today we celebrate this historic milestone, as well as ongoing efforts toward full equality.

uspsstamps:

It’s Women’s Equality Day. On this day in 1920, the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, which granted women the right to vote, went into effect. Today we celebrate this historic milestone, as well as ongoing efforts toward full equality.

Tennis champion Molla Bjurstedt Mallory, 1922.

Tennis champion Molla Bjurstedt Mallory, 1922.

theatlantic:

How the Nixon Administration Tried to Woo Women

In the run-up to the 1972 presidential election, the Republican party had a “woman problem” — or at least, that’s what staffers in the Nixon administration believed. Previously confidential memos released on Wednesday by the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum give a glimpse of top staffers’ anxiety about attracting woman voters. As Barbara Franklin, who was in charge of recruiting more women to high-level positions in government, put it, “Polls show we’re in trouble with women voters. We simply cannot afford a mistake!” The challenge was clear, she said. “We need to create the image that women are very important to the Republican Party.”
Read more. [Image: Derrick Bostrom/Flickr]

theatlantic:

How the Nixon Administration Tried to Woo Women

In the run-up to the 1972 presidential election, the Republican party had a “woman problem” — or at least, that’s what staffers in the Nixon administration believed. Previously confidential memos released on Wednesday by the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum give a glimpse of top staffers’ anxiety about attracting woman voters. As Barbara Franklin, who was in charge of recruiting more women to high-level positions in government, put it, “Polls show we’re in trouble with women voters. We simply cannot afford a mistake!” The challenge was clear, she said. “We need to create the image that women are very important to the Republican Party.”

Read more. [Image: Derrick Bostrom/Flickr]

usnatarchives:

The girl in this mural is a real person. She’s on a wall right next to Ben’s Chili Bowl, and she’s also in the National Archives.
A photographer snapped a photo of Edith Lee-Payne, then a 12-year-old girl with her mother, holding a banner at the March on Washington.
But although the photograph was taken in 1963, Ms. Lee-Payne did not know about the image until 2008. With the help of a librarian and an archivist, she was able to locate the photograph of herself at the march.
Read her amazing story of finding herself in the National Archives.
You can see a new digitally restored version of James Blue’s 1964 film produced for the U.S. Information Agency at the National Archives on August 26, 27, and 28.
Thank you to our staff member Crystal Brooks who snapped this picture on U St in Washington, DC!
March on Washington 50th anniversary programming at the National Archives is made possible in partnership with the Foundation for the National Archives through the generous support of Texas Instruments.

usnatarchives:

The girl in this mural is a real person. She’s on a wall right next to Ben’s Chili Bowl, and she’s also in the National Archives.

A photographer snapped a photo of Edith Lee-Payne, then a 12-year-old girl with her mother, holding a banner at the March on Washington.

But although the photograph was taken in 1963, Ms. Lee-Payne did not know about the image until 2008. With the help of a librarian and an archivist, she was able to locate the photograph of herself at the march.

Read her amazing story of finding herself in the National Archives.

You can see a new digitally restored version of James Blue’s 1964 film produced for the U.S. Information Agency at the National Archives on August 26, 27, and 28.

Thank you to our staff member Crystal Brooks who snapped this picture on U St in Washington, DC!

March on Washington 50th anniversary programming at the National Archives is made possible in partnership with the Foundation for the National Archives through the generous support of Texas Instruments.

If you’ve read Flowers in the Attic, you should read this interview.

(Source: darienlibrary)

uidahodigital:


Photographer Nellie Stockbridge
In 1898, Nellie Jane Stockbridge left her home in central Illinois to accept Thomas Barnard’s offer of employment in his Wallace, Idaho photo studio. In 1907 she purchased a quarter share of the business and eventually assumed full ownership. Over the next decades, working often to exhaustion, Nellie photographed the people and places of one of the richest mining areas of the world, the Coeur d’Alene Mining District. While portrait photography was the mainstay of her studio, Nellie skillfully photographed the area’s mining industries, both above ground and below, creating a visual record of historical significance to Idaho and beyond. Nellie Stockbridge died on May 22, 1965. - Julie
See Nellie’s photographs in the Barnard Stockbridge Photograph Collection, a collection of over 1200 historical photographs collected and/or taken by T.N. Barnard or Nellie Stockbridge. The images span the years 1894 to 1964, containing images of Northern Idaho (Wallace/Kellogg area) mines, towns, fires, scenery, and historical sites.

uidahodigital:

Photographer Nellie Stockbridge

In 1898, Nellie Jane Stockbridge left her home in central Illinois to accept Thomas Barnard’s offer of employment in his Wallace, Idaho photo studio. In 1907 she purchased a quarter share of the business and eventually assumed full ownership. Over the next decades, working often to exhaustion, Nellie photographed the people and places of one of the richest mining areas of the world, the Coeur d’Alene Mining District. While portrait photography was the mainstay of her studio, Nellie skillfully photographed the area’s mining industries, both above ground and below, creating a visual record of historical significance to Idaho and beyond. Nellie Stockbridge died on May 22, 1965. - Julie

See Nellie’s photographs in the Barnard Stockbridge Photograph Collection, a collection of over 1200 historical photographs collected and/or taken by T.N. Barnard or Nellie Stockbridge. The images span the years 1894 to 1964, containing images of Northern Idaho (Wallace/Kellogg area) mines, towns, fires, scenery, and historical sites.