leanin:

On This Day in History: Billie Jean King wins the Battle of the Sexes
Forty years ago today, tennis pioneer Billie Jean King defeated self-proclaimed “male chauvinist” Bobby Riggs in one of the most-watched tennis matches in history. King would go on to win 20 Wimbledon titles and fight for equal pay for female athletes.
Photo: Neil Leifer (Sports Illustrated/Getty) 

leanin:

On This Day in History: Billie Jean King wins the Battle of the Sexes

Forty years ago today, tennis pioneer Billie Jean King defeated self-proclaimed “male chauvinist” Bobby Riggs in one of the most-watched tennis matches in history. King would go on to win 20 Wimbledon titles and fight for equal pay for female athletes.

Photo: Neil Leifer (Sports Illustrated/Getty) 

nativeamericannews:

Obama nominates Diane Humetewa, Hopi, as a federal judge
President Barack Obama has nominated Diane Humetewa, a member of the Hopi Tribe, to serve as a federal judge in Arizona.If confirmed by the Senate, Humetewa would be the first Native American woman in the federal judiciary She was the first Native woman to serve as U.S. Attorney.

nativeamericannews:

Obama nominates Diane Humetewa, Hopi, as a federal judge

President Barack Obama has nominated Diane Humetewa, a member of the Hopi Tribe, to serve as a federal judge in Arizona.
If confirmed by the Senate, Humetewa would be the first Native American woman in the federal judiciary She was the first Native woman to serve as U.S. Attorney.

(Source: indianz.com)

nprfreshair:

Tennis champion Billie Jean King recalls the 1973 Battle of the Sexes against Bobby Riggs, knowing she had to beat him for gender equality:

Remember, Title IX had just passed… it ended up being one of the most important pieces of legislation of the 20th century, particularly for women at the time … I really didn’t want that to be weakened. I thought with Margaret [Court] losing it would be a good chance for some of the people to start jumping on the bandwagon to weaken Title IX, hurt our tour, to hurt women’s sports, the women’s movement … as soon as I found out [Margaret had lost] … I knew I definitely was going to play Bobby Riggs, I did not have a choice. 

image via metro US

nprfreshair:

Tennis champion Billie Jean King recalls the 1973 Battle of the Sexes against Bobby Riggs, knowing she had to beat him for gender equality:

Remember, Title IX had just passed… it ended up being one of the most important pieces of legislation of the 20th century, particularly for women at the time … I really didn’t want that to be weakened. I thought with Margaret [Court] losing it would be a good chance for some of the people to start jumping on the bandwagon to weaken Title IX, hurt our tour, to hurt women’s sports, the women’s movement … as soon as I found out [Margaret had lost] … I knew I definitely was going to play Bobby Riggs, I did not have a choice.

image via metro US

Felisa Rincón de Gautier (1897-1994)
Art by Amanda (tumblr)
Felisa Rincón de Gautier was the first woman elected mayor of a capital city in the Americas.  The oldest of nine children, Felisa worked as a pharmacist, clothing retailer, and florist before entering politics.  Felisa was a proponent of women’s suffrage and when the Puerto Rican voter rolls opened to literate women in 1929, she was the fifth woman to register.  In 1940, she married Puerto Rican politician Genaro Gautier.
Felisa was appointed mayor of San Juan in 1949.  She repeatedly won reelection, serving as mayor until her retirement in 1969.  Felisa worked to restore Old San Juan, established aid centers for the poor, improved sanitation, and created a Civil Defense system during the Cold War.  Healthcare and child welfare were particular focuses of her administration.  Felisa renovated hospitals and created clinics in low resource areas.  She created Las Escuelas Maternales, preschool centers that served as a model for the US the Head Start program.  In 1952, 1953, and 1954, Felisa had planeloads of snow brought to San Juan so that children could see snow for the first time. 
After her retirement, Felisa served as a Goodwill Ambassador from the US to Latin America.  In 1992, Felisa served as the oldest delegate at the Democratic Convention nominating Bill Clinton for President. 

Felisa’s home in San Juan is now a museum.  In New York City, where Felisa briefly lived, both an elementary school and a high school are named in her honor.

Felisa Rincón de Gautier (1897-1994)

Art by Amanda (tumblr)

Felisa Rincón de Gautier was the first woman elected mayor of a capital city in the Americas.  The oldest of nine children, Felisa worked as a pharmacist, clothing retailer, and florist before entering politics.  Felisa was a proponent of women’s suffrage and when the Puerto Rican voter rolls opened to literate women in 1929, she was the fifth woman to register.  In 1940, she married Puerto Rican politician Genaro Gautier.

Felisa was appointed mayor of San Juan in 1949.  She repeatedly won reelection, serving as mayor until her retirement in 1969.  Felisa worked to restore Old San Juan, established aid centers for the poor, improved sanitation, and created a Civil Defense system during the Cold War.  Healthcare and child welfare were particular focuses of her administration.  Felisa renovated hospitals and created clinics in low resource areas.  She created Las Escuelas Maternales, preschool centers that served as a model for the US the Head Start program.  In 1952, 1953, and 1954, Felisa had planeloads of snow brought to San Juan so that children could see snow for the first time. 

After her retirement, Felisa served as a Goodwill Ambassador from the US to Latin America.  In 1992, Felisa served as the oldest delegate at the Democratic Convention nominating Bill Clinton for President. 

Felisa’s home in San Juan is now a museum.  In New York City, where Felisa briefly lived, both an elementary school and a high school are named in her honor.

Manuela Beltrán circa 1781
Art by Molly Ostertag (tumblr, website, webcomic)
Many of the details of Manuela’s life are lost to history, but she is known to have been the owner of a small grocery store in Socorro, Colombia.  It was uncommon for a Colombian woman of that time to own her own business.  In 1781, the Spanish colonial government posted an edict announcing an increase in taxation.  Illiteracy was widespread and as one of the few locals who could read, Manuela read the edict aloud to the crowd.  Outraged, she tore up the edict, setting off a strike that spread through what is today Colombia and Venezuela.  The strike was ultimately unsuccessful and many of its leaders were executed.  The fate of Manuela Beltrán is unknown.  A university in Bogotá is named in her honor.

Manuela Beltrán circa 1781

Art by Molly Ostertag (tumblr, website, webcomic)

Many of the details of Manuela’s life are lost to history, but she is known to have been the owner of a small grocery store in Socorro, Colombia.  It was uncommon for a Colombian woman of that time to own her own business.  In 1781, the Spanish colonial government posted an edict announcing an increase in taxation.  Illiteracy was widespread and as one of the few locals who could read, Manuela read the edict aloud to the crowd.  Outraged, she tore up the edict, setting off a strike that spread through what is today Colombia and Venezuela.  The strike was ultimately unsuccessful and many of its leaders were executed.  The fate of Manuela Beltrán is unknown.  A university in Bogotá is named in her honor.

Bedspread (Colcha), 1786 
Embroidered by Doña Rosa Solís y Menéndez in Mérida, Mexico
Metropolitan Museum of Art

Bedspread (Colcha), 1786 

Embroidered by Doña Rosa Solís y Menéndez in Mérida, Mexico

Metropolitan Museum of Art

smithsonian:

Women in Science Wednesday!
Doris Mabel Cochran (left), herpetologist, was the first female curator for the Division of Reptiles and Amphibians at the Smithsonian. Doris Holmes Blake (right), was a coleopterist (scholar of beetles) and scientific illustrator. They were friends and colleagues, and published over 175 scientific papers between them. #Groundbreaker 
Learn about how we recently confirmed a field book authored by Cochran with your help! http://s.si.edu/1aTbo9b 
More from Smithsonian Institution Archives: http://s.si.edu/16Etp6Q 

smithsonian:

Women in Science Wednesday!

Doris Mabel Cochran (left), herpetologist, was the first female curator for the Division of Reptiles and Amphibians at the Smithsonian. Doris Holmes Blake (right), was a coleopterist (scholar of beetles) and scientific illustrator. They were friends and colleagues, and published over 175 scientific papers between them. #Groundbreaker 

Learn about how we recently confirmed a field book authored by Cochran with your help! http://s.si.edu/1aTbo9b 

More from Smithsonian Institution Archives: http://s.si.edu/16Etp6Q 

Javiera Carrera (1781-1862)
Art by Jess Kubacik (tumblr)
Javiera was a member of an aristocratic and patriotic Chilean family.  The Carrera family was in favor of independence from Spain and although Javiera never held office, she is known as the Mother of Chile for her work as an adviser and organizer.  Javiera is believed to have sewn the first Chilean flag.  

Javiera Carrera (1781-1862)

Art by Jess Kubacik (tumblr)

Javiera was a member of an aristocratic and patriotic Chilean family.  The Carrera family was in favor of independence from Spain and although Javiera never held office, she is known as the Mother of Chile for her work as an adviser and organizer.  Javiera is believed to have sewn the first Chilean flag.  

Dolores Elizabeth “Lola” Chávez de Armijo (1858-1929)
Art by Andy Purviance (tumblr)
Lola was New Mexico’s State Librarian until the state’s first governor attempted to replace her with a political crony in 1912.  The governor was a Democrat and it was customary for new appointments to be made when the administration changed.  After his first is first nominee, Mary Victory, was rejected by the Republican chair of the Committee on Executive Communication, the governor changed tactics and claimed women did not have the right to hold office under the constitution and laws of New Mexico.  Lola took him to court in 1913 and the New Mexico Supreme Court found in her favor.  Soon after, the legislature passed a law allowing women to hold any appointed office.
A marker outside Albuquerque commemorates Lola’s groundbreaking achievement.  

Dolores Elizabeth “Lola” Chávez de Armijo (1858-1929)

Art by Andy Purviance (tumblr)

Lola was New Mexico’s State Librarian until the state’s first governor attempted to replace her with a political crony in 1912.  The governor was a Democrat and it was customary for new appointments to be made when the administration changed.  After his first is first nominee, Mary Victory, was rejected by the Republican chair of the Committee on Executive Communication, the governor changed tactics and claimed women did not have the right to hold office under the constitution and laws of New Mexico.  Lola took him to court in 1913 and the New Mexico Supreme Court found in her favor.  Soon after, the legislature passed a law allowing women to hold any appointed office.

A marker outside Albuquerque commemorates Lola’s groundbreaking achievement.  

Hispanic American Heritage Month

September 15 - October 15

Photos from previous posts: Las TulesMaria Gonzalez and soldaderasEllen Ochoa.

wiscohisto:

Log cabin quilt in “barn raising” pattern, Lydia Warner Atherton, Bridgeport, Crawford County, Wisconsin, ca. 1860-1900.
via: Rock County Historical Society by way of Wisconsin Decorative Arts Database

wiscohisto:

Log cabin quilt in “barn raising” pattern, Lydia Warner Atherton, Bridgeport, Crawford County, Wisconsin, ca. 1860-1900.

via: Rock County Historical Society by way of Wisconsin Decorative Arts Database

humansofnewyork:

"I lived in Poland, so we were persecuted from the first day of the war. First they took us from our home, then they put us in a ghetto, then they made us march, then they sent us to the camps. I was separated from everyone, but my brother later told me that my father froze to death. But I have children now, and grandchildren, and great grandchildren— a great big family, all of them educated. Look at everything that came from just one person who escaped. Just goes to show that you can never kill a people with hate. There will always be someone left to carry on.”

humansofnewyork:

"I lived in Poland, so we were persecuted from the first day of the war. First they took us from our home, then they put us in a ghetto, then they made us march, then they sent us to the camps. I was separated from everyone, but my brother later told me that my father froze to death. But I have children now, and grandchildren, and great grandchildren— a great big family, all of them educated. Look at everything that came from just one person who escaped. Just goes to show that you can never kill a people with hate. There will always be someone left to carry on.”

Google Doodle celebrating the 153rd birthday of Jane Addams.
Jane Addams was one of the best known social justice activists of the early 20th century.  A suffragette, she emphasized the importance of women in creating positive communities.  Jane also advocated for children, immigrants, ethnic minorities, and workers.  Jane pioneered the settlement movement, founding Hull House in Chicago, the US’s first settlement house. Hull House provided education for adults and children, as well as social and artistic programming.  Jane fought for better sanitation programs and against government corruption.  Her work influenced social reformers worldwide and contributed to the development of professional social work. Jane was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1931 for her work promoting the preservation of peace worldwide.
For more information: Stuff You Missed in History Class's recent two part podcast on Jane Addams.

Google Doodle celebrating the 153rd birthday of Jane Addams.

Jane Addams was one of the best known social justice activists of the early 20th century.  A suffragette, she emphasized the importance of women in creating positive communities.  Jane also advocated for children, immigrants, ethnic minorities, and workers.  Jane pioneered the settlement movement, founding Hull House in Chicago, the US’s first settlement house. Hull House provided education for adults and children, as well as social and artistic programming.  Jane fought for better sanitation programs and against government corruption.  Her work influenced social reformers worldwide and contributed to the development of professional social work. Jane was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1931 for her work promoting the preservation of peace worldwide.

For more information: Stuff You Missed in History Class's recent two part podcast on Jane Addams.

Praying on the Williamsburg Bridge, NYC
Rosh Hashanah 1909
It is customary to pray near naturally flowing water, symbolically casting away your sins.  Sometimes pebbles or small pieces of bread are thrown.

Praying on the Williamsburg Bridge, NYC

Rosh Hashanah 1909

It is customary to pray near naturally flowing water, symbolically casting away your sins.  Sometimes pebbles or small pieces of bread are thrown.