oaklandtribunearchives:

FIRST VOTERS OF CALIFORNIA

Oakland, CA November 8, 1911 - Emma Tom Lueng (left) and Clara Lee were the first Chinese women to register to vote in California. They are shown here at the Alameda County Court House. From left are Mr. Tom Lueng, Emma’s husband, Dr. Charles G. Lee, Clara’s husband, and County Clerk W. B. Reith. 

(Edward “Doc” Rogers / Oakland Tribune)

Full story (pdf)

oupacademic:

By the time James Garfield and Lucretia entered the White House, they had a strong, committed marriage, soon to be cut short by President Garfield’s assassination. During their courtship, they both expressed doubts about their relationship; Lucretia warned James before the wedding that her “heart is not yet schooled to an entire submission to that destiny which will make me the wife of one who marries me.” They spent most of the first few years of their marriage apart, with Lucretia continuing to teach and Garfield enlisting during the Civil War and devoting his attentions to a New York widow. James made it clear that he did not wish to have “any[thing] other than a business correspondence” with his wife. Following the death of two young children, the couple became much closer. She kept vigil next to his bedside during the three months he languished following the assassination attempt, and she later supervised the preservation of his extensive papers. Although she had time to destroy the letters that showed the problems in their relationship, she never did so. Betty Boyd Caroli finds that the correspondence shows “an intelligent, capable woman who reluctantly relinquished her own autonomy in favor of her husband’s career.” 
Facts and quotations from First Ladies: From Martha Washington to Michelle Obama by Betty Boyd Caroli. C-SPAN is exploring the influence of First Ladies in its new series.
Image: Mrs. James Garfield, photographed between 1860 and 1870, printed later. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress. 

oupacademic:

By the time James Garfield and Lucretia entered the White House, they had a strong, committed marriage, soon to be cut short by President Garfield’s assassination. During their courtship, they both expressed doubts about their relationship; Lucretia warned James before the wedding that her “heart is not yet schooled to an entire submission to that destiny which will make me the wife of one who marries me.” They spent most of the first few years of their marriage apart, with Lucretia continuing to teach and Garfield enlisting during the Civil War and devoting his attentions to a New York widow. James made it clear that he did not wish to have “any[thing] other than a business correspondence” with his wife. Following the death of two young children, the couple became much closer. She kept vigil next to his bedside during the three months he languished following the assassination attempt, and she later supervised the preservation of his extensive papers. Although she had time to destroy the letters that showed the problems in their relationship, she never did so. Betty Boyd Caroli finds that the correspondence shows “an intelligent, capable woman who reluctantly relinquished her own autonomy in favor of her husband’s career.” 

Facts and quotations from First Ladies: From Martha Washington to Michelle Obama by Betty Boyd Caroli. C-SPAN is exploring the influence of First Ladies in its new series.

Image: Mrs. James Garfield, photographed between 1860 and 1870, printed later. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress. 

oaklandtribunearchives:

MING QUONG CHINESE HOME

High school girls from the Ming Quong Home, formerly an orphanage at Eighth and Fallon Streets, who graduated from the Red Cross Home Nursing Class are shown in this photo from December 1944.

In the back row, left to right are : Lessie Wong, Harriett Jung, Frances Choy, Bessie Wong, Sue Leon and Elaine Gee.

Front row, left to right are: Lillian Cope, Junnie Wong, Bobbie Mai Ung and Sally Woo.

In the second photo, some of the 40 women from Oakland’s Chinatown gathered daily at the Ming Quong Home to prepare bandages and clothing for relief of stricken people in the Sino-Japanese war areas during September 1947.

Three of the women are identified but not where they appear in the photo. They are: Mrs. Joe See, Mamie Lee and Mrs. Y. P. Lai. If you can identify these or any of the other women, please contact us.

(Photos by the Oakland Tribune)

ourpresidents:

The American Red Cross was founded on this day — May 21, 1881.
On the founding anniversary of the American Red Cross, here’s Kathleen Kennedy in her A.R.C. uniform from World War II. The photo was taken in London, circa 1943.
Kathleen was the second daughter and fourth child of Joseph and Rose Kennedy.
While in college, Kathleen Kennedy began volunteering for the Red Cross in New York in the summer of 1940.  After working for the Times-Herald newspaper, she rejoined the war effort by volunteering again for the Red Cross, this time in London. Read More 
-From the JFK Library
Our gratitude goes out to all the volunteers and relief workers of the Red Cross in Oklahoma today, and across the world everyday.

ourpresidents:

The American Red Cross was founded on this day — May 21, 1881.

On the founding anniversary of the American Red Cross, here’s Kathleen Kennedy in her A.R.C. uniform from World War II. The photo was taken in London, circa 1943.

Kathleen was the second daughter and fourth child of Joseph and Rose Kennedy.

While in college, Kathleen Kennedy began volunteering for the Red Cross in New York in the summer of 1940.  After working for the Times-Herald newspaper, she rejoined the war effort by volunteering again for the Red Cross, this time in London. Read More

-From the JFK Library

Our gratitude goes out to all the volunteers and relief workers of the Red Cross in Oklahoma today, and across the world everyday.

Two girls in a music room, playing yangqins, a dulcimer-like instrument, at the Children’s Palace, Shanghai, China.
1979

Two girls in a music room, playing yangqins, a dulcimer-like instrument, at the Children’s Palace, Shanghai, China.

1979

slatevault:

The fiercely independent Eleanor Roosevelt had a permit to carry a pistol. Here it is: http://slate.me/14IGr07

slatevault:

The fiercely independent Eleanor Roosevelt had a permit to carry a pistol. Here it is: http://slate.me/14IGr07

hagleydigital:

Stephanie L. Kwolek, developer of Kevlar (circa 1995)
While working with DuPont Stephanie Kwolek developed the first liquid crystal polymer which provided the basis for Kevlar brand fiber.

hagleydigital:

Stephanie L. Kwolek, developer of Kevlar (circa 1995)

While working with DuPont Stephanie Kwolek developed the first liquid crystal polymer which provided the basis for Kevlar brand fiber.

(Source: hagleyvault)

Among the upcoming Asian Pacific American events at the Smithsonian:

American Indian Museum (NYC): kids make a Native Hawaiian style bookmark

Portrait Gallery (DC): Anna May Wong story time and craft

American Indian Museum (DC): Amy Hanaiali‘i Gilliom concert

oaklandtribunearchives:

Oakland, CA April 26, 1939 - Lee Ya-Ching arrives at the Oakland Airport aboard her red and yellow “Spirit of New China” plane on her campaign to raise funds for China’s 30 million war refugees. She was greeted by China’s vice-consul to San Francisco Patrick Sun. 

Lee studied and earned her license at the Boeing School of Aeronautics in Oakland, California in 1935.

(Oakland Tribune Photos)

If you are interested in learning more about Lee, Air & Space magazine, a publication of The Smithsonian, has a very knowledgable article about her on their website http://www.airspacemag.com/history-of-flight/Chinas_First_Lady_of_Flight.html

Hattie Kawahara, American-Japanese student at Mt. Holyoke College, is shown weeding the college victory garden, 1943.

Hattie Kawahara, American-Japanese student at Mt. Holyoke College, is shown weeding the college victory garden, 1943.

Rani Durgavati (1524-1564)
Pencil drawing by Lauren Goldberg (personal tumblr, art tumblr)
Rani Durgavati ruled the Gond Kingdom in central India as regent for her son from 1550 to 1564.  In 1562, the Mughal General Asaf Khan attempted to annex Rani’s prosperous lands.  Rani personally led her troops into battle and succeeded in defeating the Mughal invaders.  Two years later, Rani attacked the Mughals with the hope of a permanent victory.  Outnumber 20,000 to 50,000, Rani held her ground for two days before she decided to commit suicide rather than surrender.  Her son was killed in battle and the Gond Kingdom fell to the Mughals.  
Rani Durgavati Fort in Mandla is open to visitors.  However, it is considered an unsafe place for women to visit.  According to The Times of India, at least two gang rapes were reported at Rani Durgavati Fort in 2012.

Rani Durgavati (1524-1564)

Pencil drawing by Lauren Goldberg (personal tumblr, art tumblr)

Rani Durgavati ruled the Gond Kingdom in central India as regent for her son from 1550 to 1564.  In 1562, the Mughal General Asaf Khan attempted to annex Rani’s prosperous lands.  Rani personally led her troops into battle and succeeded in defeating the Mughal invaders.  Two years later, Rani attacked the Mughals with the hope of a permanent victory.  Outnumber 20,000 to 50,000, Rani held her ground for two days before she decided to commit suicide rather than surrender.  Her son was killed in battle and the Gond Kingdom fell to the Mughals.  

Rani Durgavati Fort in Mandla is open to visitors.  However, it is considered an unsafe place for women to visit.  According to The Times of India, at least two gang rapes were reported at Rani Durgavati Fort in 2012.

"

Hoping to blossom (one day) into a flower,
Every bud sits, holding its soul in its fist.

Between the fear of the fowler and (approaching) autumn,
The bulbul’s life hangs by a thread.

Thy sly glance is more murderous than arrow or sword;
It has shed the blood of many lover.

How can I liken a candle to thy (glowing) cheek?
The candle is blind with the fat in its eyes.

How can Chanda be dry lipped. O Saqi of the heavenly wine!
She has drained the cup of thy love.

"

"Hoping to blossom (one day) into a flower"

Mah Laqa Bai (1768-1824)

Translated by Syed Sirajuddin, Women Writing in India: 600 BC to the Present

(Source: books.google.com)

Mah Laqa Bai Chanda (1768-1824)
Art by Henrico Leorne (tumblr)
Mah Laqa Bai was a tawaif (courtesan) and a trusted adviser to the Nizam of Hyderabad.  She was appointed to the omarah (highest nobility) and  frequently consulted with the local rulers on government matters.
Tawaifs were accomplished artists and Mah Laqa Bai is best known as the first significant female poet to write in Urdu.  In 1799, she gave a manuscript entitled Diwan e Chanda to a British captain.  Today this manuscript is housed in the British Museum.  Gulzar-e-Mahlaqa (Mahlaqa’s flowers), a book of 39 Ghazals, was published soon after her death.
A patron of the arts, Mah Laqa Bai endowed several shrines during her lifetime.  After her death, her wealth was distributed to homeless women.  Mah Laqa Bai’s tomb in Hyderabad was restored in 2011. 

Mah Laqa Bai Chanda (1768-1824)

Art by Henrico Leorne (tumblr)

Mah Laqa Bai was a tawaif (courtesan) and a trusted adviser to the Nizam of Hyderabad.  She was appointed to the omarah (highest nobility) and  frequently consulted with the local rulers on government matters.

Tawaifs were accomplished artists and Mah Laqa Bai is best known as the first significant female poet to write in Urdu.  In 1799, she gave a manuscript entitled Diwan e Chanda to a British captain.  Today this manuscript is housed in the British Museum.  Gulzar-e-Mahlaqa (Mahlaqa’s flowers), a book of 39 Ghazals, was published soon after her death.

A patron of the arts, Mah Laqa Bai endowed several shrines during her lifetime.  After her death, her wealth was distributed to homeless women.  Mah Laqa Bai’s tomb in Hyderabad was restored in 2011

oupacademic:

Eliza Johnson stayed out of the public eye as First Lady to President Johnson, partly due to Mary Lincoln’s poor public opinion and partly due to grief and illness. But “her invisibility should not be taken for inactivity.”  When Eliza and Andrew first met in their teens, Eliza tutored him and helped him overcome his lack of formal education. In their White House years, “she clipped articles she thought he would see, shrewdly separating the good news which she gave at the end of each day, from the bad, which he got the next morning. One historian concluded that Andrew Johnson “may have consulted his wife and daughters more than he did any fellow statesman.”  
Facts from First Ladies: From Martha Washington to Michelle Obama by Betty Boyd Caroli. C-SPAN is exploring the influence of First Ladies in its new series
Image: Mrs. Andrew Johnson  engraved by J.C. Buttre, published 1883. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.  

oupacademic:

Eliza Johnson stayed out of the public eye as First Lady to President Johnson, partly due to Mary Lincoln’s poor public opinion and partly due to grief and illness. But “her invisibility should not be taken for inactivity.”  When Eliza and Andrew first met in their teens, Eliza tutored him and helped him overcome his lack of formal education. In their White House years, “she clipped articles she thought he would see, shrewdly separating the good news which she gave at the end of each day, from the bad, which he got the next morning. One historian concluded that Andrew Johnson “may have consulted his wife and daughters more than he did any fellow statesman.”  

Facts from First Ladies: From Martha Washington to Michelle Obama by Betty Boyd Caroli. C-SPAN is exploring the influence of First Ladies in its new series

Image: Mrs. Andrew Johnson  engraved by J.C. Buttre, published 1883. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.  

nwkarchivist:

Barbara Walters Has Announced Her Retirement In 2014.  Let’s Not Forget How Groundbreaking She Was 40 Years Ago.