Korean women playing Go via Cornell University Library

'Paduk' (Korean) or Go (Japanese), has been a highly popular game played in China, Japan and Korea for centuries. The Go-game board is a wooden square which has 361 intersections formed by 19 vertical and 19 horizontal lines. Each player is given either white or black round flat stones and is free to place in turn one stone at any point of intersections. Placing the stone continues until the game is over. The player with the black stones usually starts. The players try to conquer territories by enclosing vacant points by enclosing them with their own stones. Single stone or many stones of the opponent can be captured and removed from the board by completely surrounding them with your stones. A player's final score is determined by the number of territorial points he/she made, minus the number of his/her stones captured by the opponent. The player who has a higher score wins the game. 

Korean women playing Go via Cornell University Library

'Paduk' (Korean) or Go (Japanese), has been a highly popular game played in China, Japan and Korea for centuries. The Go-game board is a wooden square which has 361 intersections formed by 19 vertical and 19 horizontal lines. Each player is given either white or black round flat stones and is free to place in turn one stone at any point of intersections. Placing the stone continues until the game is over. The player with the black stones usually starts. The players try to conquer territories by enclosing vacant points by enclosing them with their own stones. Single stone or many stones of the opponent can be captured and removed from the board by completely surrounding them with your stones. A player's final score is determined by the number of territorial points he/she made, minus the number of his/her stones captured by the opponent. The player who has a higher score wins the game. 

Chinese school children in Central Park.
The PS on their sashes stands for Public School and that numbering system is still in use today in New York City.  However, as the numbers were created as schools were built in each borough of New York City, there are four PS 108s, one each in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx.  My guess is that these students were from what is today PS 108 Assemblyman Angelo Del Toro Educational Complex in Manhattan.

Chinese school children in Central Park.

The PS on their sashes stands for Public School and that numbering system is still in use today in New York City.  However, as the numbers were created as schools were built in each borough of New York City, there are four PS 108s, one each in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx.  My guess is that these students were from what is today PS 108 Assemblyman Angelo Del Toro Educational Complex in Manhattan.

Yei Theodora Ozaki with her husband Yukio Ozaki, “father of the Japanese Constitution.”
Of mixed Japanese and English parentage, Yei Theodora Ozaki was well known for her English translations of Japanese fairy tales. Yei fled an arranged marriage as a young girl and remained single until her 30s when a postal mistake over their similar names introduced her to her future husband.    

Yei Theodora Ozaki with her husband Yukio Ozaki, “father of the Japanese Constitution.”

Of mixed Japanese and English parentage, Yei Theodora Ozaki was well known for her English translations of Japanese fairy tales. Yei fled an arranged marriage as a young girl and remained single until her 30s when a postal mistake over their similar names introduced her to her future husband.    

May is Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month

Photos from previous posts: Indira GandhiDevi DjaKorean girlTokyo Woman’s Rights MeetingCarmen Aguinaldo, and Soong Ch’ing-ling.

wiscohisto:

Professional Opportunities in Home EconomicsImages of women in the kitchen are a familiar scene in home economics, but what these images don’t show is the important role that home economics played in getting women into higher education. From its inception, collegiate home economics was multidisciplinary and integrative with an emphasis on science applied to the real world of the home, family, and community. It was an academic science designed by women for women. In the first half of the 20th century, these programs prepared women for teaching but also for careers in extension services, state and federal government, industry, restaurants, hotels, and hospitals. The University of Wisconsin got its own Department of Home Economics in 1903. This image shows students working in one of the department kitchens in the 1910s.
via: UW-Madison Archives by way of University of Wisconsin Digital Collections

Home economic departments were important in the development of higher level education for women.  Some female scientists such as Mary Engle Pennington found employment as food safety specialists thanks to the development of home economics as a science. College Girls and the History of Home Ec episode from Stuff Mom Never Told You have further details about the history of these programs.

wiscohisto:

Professional Opportunities in Home Economics
Images of women in the kitchen are a familiar scene in home economics, but what these images don’t show is the important role that home economics played in getting women into higher education. From its inception, collegiate home economics was multidisciplinary and integrative with an emphasis on science applied to the real world of the home, family, and community. It was an academic science designed by women for women. In the first half of the 20th century, these programs prepared women for teaching but also for careers in extension services, state and federal government, industry, restaurants, hotels, and hospitals.

The University of Wisconsin got its own Department of Home Economics in 1903. This image shows students working in one of the department kitchens in the 1910s.

via: UW-Madison Archives by way of University of Wisconsin Digital Collections

Home economic departments were important in the development of higher level education for women.  Some female scientists such as Mary Engle Pennington found employment as food safety specialists thanks to the development of home economics as a science. College Girls and the History of Home Ec episode from Stuff Mom Never Told You have further details about the history of these programs.

Women dancing with veils at the May Day Pageant, Oregon State University

Women dancing with veils at the May Day Pageant, Oregon State University

At UCLA commencement, Cathy Wolfe wears peace symbol on cap, Sheila Matzold appears without traditional cap and gown, and Sharon Griffith wears a “Peace Now” armband.
Los Angeles Times
June 18, 1970

At UCLA commencement, Cathy Wolfe wears peace symbol on cap, Sheila Matzold appears without traditional cap and gown, and Sharon Griffith wears a “Peace Now” armband.

Los Angeles Times

June 18, 1970

"

(Nuns) were the first feminists, earning Ph.D.’s or working as surgeons long before it was fashionable for women to hold jobs. As managers of hospitals, schools and complex bureaucracies, they were the first female C.E.O.’s.

They are also among the bravest, toughest and most admirable people in the world. In my travels, I’ve seen heroic nuns defy warlords, pimps and bandits. Even as bishops have disgraced the church by covering up the rape of children, nuns have redeemed it with their humble work on behalf of the neediest.

So, Pope Benedict, all I can say is: You are crazy to mess with nuns.

The Vatican issued a stinging reprimand of American nuns this month and ordered a bishop to oversee a makeover of the organization that represents 80 percent of them. In effect, the Vatican accused the nuns of worrying too much about the poor and not enough about abortion and gay marriage.

What Bible did that come from? Jesus in the Gospels repeatedly talks about poverty and social justice, yet never explicitly mentions either abortion or homosexuality. If you look at who has more closely emulated Jesus’s life, Pope Benedict or your average nun, it’s the nun hands down.

Since the papal crackdown on nuns, they have received an outpouring of support. “Nuns were approached by Catholics at Sunday liturgies across the country with a simple question: ‘What can we do to help?’ ” The National Catholic Reporter recounted. It cited one parish where a declaration of support for nuns from the pulpit drew loud applause, and another that was filled with shouts like, “You go, girl!”

At least four petition drives are under way to support the nuns. One on Change.org has gathered 15,000 signatures. The headline for this column comes from an essay by Mary E. Hunt, a Catholic theologian who is developing a proposal for Catholics to redirect some contributions from local parishes to nuns.

“How dare they go after 57,000 dedicated women whose median age is well over 70 and who work tirelessly for a more just world?” Hunt wrote. “How dare the very men who preside over a church in utter disgrace due to sexual misconduct and cover-ups by bishops try to distract from their own problems by creating new ones for women religious?”

Sister Joan Chittister, a prominent Benedictine nun, said she had worried at first that nuns spend so much time with the poor that they would have no allies. She added that the flood of support had left her breathless.

“It’s stunningly wonderful,” she said. “You see generations of laypeople who know where the sisters are — in the streets, in the soup kitchens, anywhere where there’s pain. They’re with the dying, with the sick, and people know it.”

"

New York Times columnist NICK KRISTOF, “We Are All Nuns” (via inothernews)

I think this is the petition mentioned.  Right now it has 26,887 signatures.  The petition is organized by Nun Justice who are on tumblr.

Julian Fellows has cited To Marry an English Lord as one of his major inspirations for Downton Abbey, saying “It occurred to me that while it must have been wonderful for these girls to begin with, what happened 25 years later when they were freezing in a house in Cheshire aching for Long Island?”  Thanks to Downton Abbey Mania, a new edition of this previously out of print book has just been released.
A stream of wealthy American women married into the British aristocracy during the Victorian and Edwardian periods.  The closed nature of New York society excluded the nouveau riche, leaving many Robber Baron heiresses with few marriage options.  Meanwhile, the future Edward VII had a fondness for American women that made wealthy, charming Yanks desirable party goers across the pond, regardless of their status at home.  Falling agricultural returns meant that many in the British aristocracy were cash strapped and thus more interested than ever before in a match with a wealthy foreign heiress.  
To Marry an English Lord covers how these Americans found British husbands, from their Worth wardrobes to their social graces, and how they fared as peeresses.  Jennie Jerome, mother of Winston Churchill was among the first Dollar princesses, while Nancy Astor, the first woman to take a seat in Parliament, was among the last.  At the same time, there were disastrous marriages such as that of Consuelo Vanderbilt to the Duke a Marlborough which eventually ended in divorce.  
I found the layout of this book a little distracting, too many text boxes interrupted the flow, and I would have liked color images rather than black and white.  But it is fascinating to read about the details of these women’s lives, particularly if you’re an Edith Wharton or Downton Abbey fan. 

Julian Fellows has cited To Marry an English Lord as one of his major inspirations for Downton Abbey, saying “It occurred to me that while it must have been wonderful for these girls to begin with, what happened 25 years later when they were freezing in a house in Cheshire aching for Long Island?”  Thanks to Downton Abbey Mania, a new edition of this previously out of print book has just been released.

A stream of wealthy American women married into the British aristocracy during the Victorian and Edwardian periods.  The closed nature of New York society excluded the nouveau riche, leaving many Robber Baron heiresses with few marriage options.  Meanwhile, the future Edward VII had a fondness for American women that made wealthy, charming Yanks desirable party goers across the pond, regardless of their status at home.  Falling agricultural returns meant that many in the British aristocracy were cash strapped and thus more interested than ever before in a match with a wealthy foreign heiress.  

To Marry an English Lord covers how these Americans found British husbands, from their Worth wardrobes to their social graces, and how they fared as peeresses.  Jennie Jerome, mother of Winston Churchill was among the first Dollar princesses, while Nancy Astor, the first woman to take a seat in Parliament, was among the last.  At the same time, there were disastrous marriages such as that of Consuelo Vanderbilt to the Duke a Marlborough which eventually ended in divorce.  

I found the layout of this book a little distracting, too many text boxes interrupted the flow, and I would have liked color images rather than black and white.  But it is fascinating to read about the details of these women’s lives, particularly if you’re an Edith Wharton or Downton Abbey fan. 

todaysdocument:

Equal Pay for Women - Appealing to the Board

President Franklin D. Roosevelt set up the National War Labor Board in January 1942. The Board mediated wartime labor disputes and consisted of representatives from business, organized labor, and the public. Women asked the National War Labor Board that they be paid the same amount as men would be paid for the work they were doing. This special representative’s report sets forth provisions respecting wage rates for women.

Special Representative’s Report on Retroactive Date for Women’s Pay Adjustments, 04/29/1943

University of Chicago co-eds Marian McKenney, Jane Brady, and Natalie Stern, 1935.

University of Chicago co-eds Marian McKenney, Jane Brady, and Natalie Stern, 1935.

"I remember telephoning Robin Hankey, the secretary at the embassy in Warsaw, and saying, ‘The war’s begun’. He said, ‘Rubbish, they’re still negotiating’. And I said, ‘Can’t you hear it?’ So I hung the telephone out the window so he could listen to the Germans invading."

— Clare Hollingworth, the first journalist to report the outbreak of World War II

(Source: telegraph.co.uk)

Woman’s rights meeting, Tokyo 

Woman’s rights meeting, Tokyo 

publicaffairsbooks:

On this Administrative Professionals’ Day, a photo of our author Lynn Povich—who became the first woman senior editor at Newsweek—back when she was a researcher in the Paris office. Lynn’s book, The Good Girls Revolt: How the Women of Newsweek Sued their Bosses and Changed the Workplace, comes out in September.

publicaffairsbooks:

On this Administrative Professionals’ Day, a photo of our author Lynn Povich—who became the first woman senior editor at Newsweek—back when she was a researcher in the Paris office. Lynn’s book, The Good Girls Revolt: How the Women of Newsweek Sued their Bosses and Changed the Workplace, comes out in September.

There is framed photo of suffragette Helen Hitchcock over Sue Wilson’s desk on Veep.

That photo was one of my first Cool Chicks from History posts and it is originally from the Library of Congress.  I’m impressed by the set decoration.  Massive thanks to quatre1six for the screenshot!