I’ve decided to change the focus of my blog to men’s history

Men’s history, particularly the history of Caucasian men, is too often overlooked.  I mean, how many people know about the accomplishments of people like Winston Churchill or Thomas Jefferson?  We learn so much about the history of great women in school but hardly anything about great men.

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Where in the world are you?

Just curious (and yes, I asked this before, but it was months ago)

These Jewish children are on their way to Palestine after having been released from the Buchenwald Concentration Camp. The girl on the left is from Poland, the boy in the center from Latvia, and the girl on right from Hungary.
June 5, 1945

These Jewish children are on their way to Palestine after having been released from the Buchenwald Concentration Camp. The girl on the left is from Poland, the boy in the center from Latvia, and the girl on right from Hungary.

June 5, 1945

Chicago Daily News photo of First Methodist Episcopal Women’s basketball player Lillian Burress, 1909.

Chicago Daily News photo of First Methodist Episcopal Women’s basketball player Lillian Burress, 1909.

frenchhistory:


Arrivée de l’archiduchesse Marie-Louise à Compiègne. Pauline AUZOU.
@credits

Marie Louise of Austria  was the second wife of Napoleon I, Emperor of the French and later Duchess of Parma. As such, she was Empress of the French from 1810 to 1814, and subsequently ruler of Parma, Piacenza and Guastalla from 1814 until her death.

frenchhistory:

Arrivée de l’archiduchesse Marie-Louise à Compiègne.
Pauline AUZOU.

@credits

Marie Louise of Austria  was the second wife of Napoleon I, Emperor of the French and later Duchess of Parma. As such, she was Empress of the French from 1810 to 1814, and subsequently ruler of Parma, Piacenza and Guastalla from 1814 until her death.

livelymorgue:

March 1940: Before spring arrived in New York, The Times ran a photo spread of circus performers putting the final polish on their acts in their winter quarters in Sarasota, Fla.  Here, the caption said, “an aerial troupe practices in a treetop setting very different from that of Madison Square Garden or the ‘big top.’ ” Photo: The New York Times

rose-verres:

“A three second exposure meant that subjects had to stand very still to avoid being blurred, and holding a smile for that period was tricky. As a result, we have a tendency to see our Victorian ancestors as even more formal and stern than they might have been.”

rose-verres:

“A three second exposure meant that subjects had to stand very still to avoid being blurred, and holding a smile for that period was tricky. As a result, we have a tendency to see our Victorian ancestors as even more formal and stern than they might have been.”

Winners of the North Hollywood Beautiful anti-litter essay contest, 1959.

Winners of the North Hollywood Beautiful anti-litter essay contest, 1959.

chicagohistorymuseum:

Portrait of superintendent of schools Mrs. Ella Flagg Young standing with students outdoors at the Mary Crane Nursery, an open-air school, located at 782 West Cabrini Street (formerly 782 Ewing), 1910.
Want a copy of this photo?> Visit our Rights and Reproductions Department and give them this number: DN-0008011.

Ella Flagg Young was the first woman in the US to head a large school system and the first female president of the National Education Association.
The Mary Crane Nursery was a school for low income children associated with Hull House.  In 1914, the Mary Crane Nursery was a year round outdoor program.  The average January temperature for Chicago is 30°F/1°C.

chicagohistorymuseum:

Portrait of superintendent of schools Mrs. Ella Flagg Young standing with students outdoors at the Mary Crane Nursery, an open-air school, located at 782 West Cabrini Street (formerly 782 Ewing), 1910.

Want a copy of this photo?
> Visit our Rights and Reproductions Department and give them this number: DN-0008011.

Ella Flagg Young was the first woman in the US to head a large school system and the first female president of the National Education Association.

The Mary Crane Nursery was a school for low income children associated with Hull House.  In 1914, the Mary Crane Nursery was a year round outdoor program.  The average January temperature for Chicago is 30°F/1°C.

Eliza Ruhamah Scidmore (1856–1928) was an American writer, photographer and geographer with a particular interest in East Asia.  Eliza had the initial idea to plant Japanese Cherry Blossoms along the Potomac River in Washington, DC.
For 24 years, Eliza suggested planting cherry blossom trees to every US Army Supervisor.  She eventually decided to raise the money for the project herself, but when she informed First Lady Helen Taft of her idea she found an ally.  Helen suggested an avenue of trees be planted along the speedway.  Today this speedway is known as the tidal basin and home to 1,800 Japanese Cherry Blossom trees, a gift from the Mayor of Tokyo.    
Today is the 100th anniversary of the planting of the first Japanese Cherry Blossoms.

Eliza Ruhamah Scidmore (1856–1928) was an American writer, photographer and geographer with a particular interest in East Asia.  Eliza had the initial idea to plant Japanese Cherry Blossoms along the Potomac River in Washington, DC.

For 24 years, Eliza suggested planting cherry blossom trees to every US Army Supervisor.  She eventually decided to raise the money for the project herself, but when she informed First Lady Helen Taft of her idea she found an ally.  Helen suggested an avenue of trees be planted along the speedway.  Today this speedway is known as the tidal basin and home to 1,800 Japanese Cherry Blossom trees, a gift from the Mayor of Tokyo.    

Today is the 100th anniversary of the planting of the first Japanese Cherry Blossoms.

Los Angeles Times
October 18, 1947

HALT! — These four young women are members of the first pistol-trained feminine class at the Police Academy and were graduated yesterday. From left, Alice Houghton, wearing the new policewomen’s uniform; Florence L. Reid, Darlene E. Wright and Edna L. Antonich. The last three demonstrated their skill as expert markswomen.

Los Angeles Times

October 18, 1947

HALT! — These four young women are members of the first pistol-trained feminine class at the Police Academy and were graduated yesterday. From left, Alice Houghton, wearing the new policewomen’s uniform; Florence L. Reid, Darlene E. Wright and Edna L. Antonich. The last three demonstrated their skill as expert markswomen.

"Kate Alterman chose the fiery race to the roof. She pulled her coat up around her face and moved towards the blaze. As she hurried, stumbling, across the room, she saw people catching fire around her. She looked down to find her pocketbook was burning in her hands. Passing the examining tables, Alterman grabbed a few unburned garments and tried to cover her head. The flames were closing around the doorway, and someone grabbed Alterman’s dress to hold her back. ‘I kicked her with my foot and I don’t know what became of her.’"

lespapillonsfurieux:

25 March 1949 Soviet Union organised mass deportation of 90,000 Baltic nationals to Siberia.
Today, we light 22 000 candles to honor and remember those innocent people.
It affected every family here in Estonia including mine.

Called Operation Priboi, as many as 72% of the deportees are believed to have been women and children.  The goal was to crush the opponents of Soviet occupation and lessen resistance to collectivist farming by deporting entire families who were involved in resistance activities, relatives of those previously deported, and affluent farm families.  Few of those deported to Siberia were ever able to return home.

lespapillonsfurieux:

25 March 1949 Soviet Union organised mass deportation of 90,000 Baltic nationals to Siberia.

Today, we light 22 000 candles to honor and remember those innocent people.

It affected every family here in Estonia including mine.

Called Operation Priboi, as many as 72% of the deportees are believed to have been women and children.  The goal was to crush the opponents of Soviet occupation and lessen resistance to collectivist farming by deporting entire families who were involved in resistance activities, relatives of those previously deported, and affluent farm families.  Few of those deported to Siberia were ever able to return home.

As I mentioned earlier, today is the 101st anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire.  I’m also recommending Triangle: The Fire That Changed America by David Von Drehle.  
Until September 11, 2001, the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire was the worst workplace disaster in the history of New York City.  Almost 150 women died in a matter of minutes while crowds outside watched.  Teenage girls threw themselves out of windows knowing they were too high up for the nets to catch them because they didn’t want to burn to death.  
It was a pivotal moment for the labor movement.   Dozens of safety regulations were adopted in New York City and other industrial hubs following the disaster.  
Several comments on my earlier post noted that the building now belongs to NYU, but NYU students also played a role in helping workers escape the fire.  NYU law students were able to help some of the lucky few who made it to the roof cross over into safety.
Triangle: The Fire That Changed America is one of the non-fiction books I recommend to people who don’t generally like non-fiction.  After the stage is set describing the conditions of the factory and the situation of the factory workers, the book is pretty fast paced, describing how split second decisions led to life and death outcomes.  It isn’t as in depth a look at organized labor as it could be, but Triangle: The Fire That Changed America is compelling reading, particularly if you’re interested in the labor movement, the history of New York City, or Jewish and Italian immigration.

As I mentioned earlier, today is the 101st anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire.  I’m also recommending Triangle: The Fire That Changed America by David Von Drehle.  

Until September 11, 2001, the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire was the worst workplace disaster in the history of New York City.  Almost 150 women died in a matter of minutes while crowds outside watched.  Teenage girls threw themselves out of windows knowing they were too high up for the nets to catch them because they didn’t want to burn to death.  

It was a pivotal moment for the labor movement.   Dozens of safety regulations were adopted in New York City and other industrial hubs following the disaster.  

Several comments on my earlier post noted that the building now belongs to NYU, but NYU students also played a role in helping workers escape the fire.  NYU law students were able to help some of the lucky few who made it to the roof cross over into safety.

Triangle: The Fire That Changed America is one of the non-fiction books I recommend to people who don’t generally like non-fiction.  After the stage is set describing the conditions of the factory and the situation of the factory workers, the book is pretty fast paced, describing how split second decisions led to life and death outcomes.  It isn’t as in depth a look at organized labor as it could be, but Triangle: The Fire That Changed America is compelling reading, particularly if you’re interested in the labor movement, the history of New York City, or Jewish and Italian immigration.

Demonstration of protest and mourning for Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in New York City, April 1911.
Today is the 101st anniversary of the fire.  

Demonstration of protest and mourning for Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in New York City, April 1911.

Today is the 101st anniversary of the fire.