Violet Jessop (1887-1971), ocean line stewardess and nurse who survived both the sinking of the Titanic (1912) and the Britannic (1916).
More about Violet Jessop:
Word of the Titanic documentary (UK only)
Titanic Survivor By Violet Jessop and John Maxtone-Graham on Amazon

Violet Jessop (1887-1971), ocean line stewardess and nurse who survived both the sinking of the Titanic (1912) and the Britannic (1916).

More about Violet Jessop:

Word of the Titanic documentary (UK only)

Titanic Survivor By Violet Jessop and John Maxtone-Graham on Amazon

Margaret Tobin Brown presenting trophy cup award to Capt. Arthur Henry Rostron for his service in the rescue of the Titanic.  
Although she is generally remembered as the “Unsinkable Molly Brown,” Margaret did not use the nickname Molly.  
Wealthy, but born into a working class family, Margaret was known for her community involvement long before the sinking of the Titanic.  She was an active suffragette and one of the founders of the Colorado branch of the National American Woman Suffrage Association.  Margaret was also a charter member of the Denver Woman’s Club which worked to improve women’s lives through philanthropy.  She helped to develop the US’s first juvenile court, organized soup kitchens for miner’s families, and fundraised for the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Denver. 
A passenger on the Titanic, Margaret was thrown into a lifeboat and immediately worked to aid others, stripping off her own stockings to warm under dressed survivors in the frigid cold.  On board the Carpathia, Margaret spearheaded relief efforts, cajoling wealthy passengers to donate money for third class passengers who had lost family in the tragedy.  She chaired the Survivor’s Committee and in addition to presenting the cup shown above, had a medal struck for each member of the Carpathia’s crew.
Against the idea of women and children first (“Women demand equal rights on land - why not at sea?”), Margaret advocated for the enlistment of female soldiers.  During World War I, Margaret worked in France to aid allied soldiers and was awarded the French Legion of Honor.  In her final years, she fulfilled a life long dream and briefly studied to become an actress.  
More about Margaret “Molly” Brown:
Molly Brown House Museum (Denver)
The Molly Brown Birthplace and Museum (Missouri) 
History Chicks Podcast Molly Brown Episode
Molly Brown: Unraveling the Myth on Amazon
Gilded Lives, Fatal Voyage: The Titanic’s First-Class Passengers and Their World on Amazon
Heroine of the Titanic: The Real Unsinkable Molly Brown on Amazon

Margaret Tobin Brown presenting trophy cup award to Capt. Arthur Henry Rostron for his service in the rescue of the Titanic.  

Although she is generally remembered as the “Unsinkable Molly Brown,” Margaret did not use the nickname Molly.  

Wealthy, but born into a working class family, Margaret was known for her community involvement long before the sinking of the Titanic.  She was an active suffragette and one of the founders of the Colorado branch of the National American Woman Suffrage Association.  Margaret was also a charter member of the Denver Woman’s Club which worked to improve women’s lives through philanthropy.  She helped to develop the US’s first juvenile court, organized soup kitchens for miner’s families, and fundraised for the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Denver. 

A passenger on the Titanic, Margaret was thrown into a lifeboat and immediately worked to aid others, stripping off her own stockings to warm under dressed survivors in the frigid cold.  On board the Carpathia, Margaret spearheaded relief efforts, cajoling wealthy passengers to donate money for third class passengers who had lost family in the tragedy.  She chaired the Survivor’s Committee and in addition to presenting the cup shown above, had a medal struck for each member of the Carpathia’s crew.

Against the idea of women and children first (“Women demand equal rights on land - why not at sea?”), Margaret advocated for the enlistment of female soldiers.  During World War I, Margaret worked in France to aid allied soldiers and was awarded the French Legion of Honor.  In her final years, she fulfilled a life long dream and briefly studied to become an actress.  

More about Margaret “Molly” Brown:

Molly Brown House Museum (Denver)

The Molly Brown Birthplace and Museum (Missouri) 

History Chicks Podcast Molly Brown Episode

Molly Brown: Unraveling the Myth on Amazon

Gilded Lives, Fatal Voyage: The Titanic’s First-Class Passengers and Their World on Amazon

Heroine of the Titanic: The Real Unsinkable Molly Brown on Amazon

prussia1848-1871:

Cross of Merit for Women and Girls
This award (Verdienstkreuz für Frauen und Jungfrauen), similar in design to the Iron Cross but additionally adorned with a red cross symbol and a crown on the reverse, was intended as a corresponding decoration for women. Recipients were honoured at the request of Empress Augusta, the wife of the now-Kaiser Wilhelm I. Her monogram also appears on the reverse. The award was instituted in 1871 to commemorate the Franco-Prussian war of 1870/1. The majority of the recipients appear to be royals and the wives and daughters of the aristocracy; also honoured were women who had cared for the wounded during the war.
The full list of recipients can be viewed here.

prussia1848-1871:

Cross of Merit for Women and Girls

This award (Verdienstkreuz für Frauen und Jungfrauen), similar in design to the Iron Cross but additionally adorned with a red cross symbol and a crown on the reverse, was intended as a corresponding decoration for women. Recipients were honoured at the request of Empress Augusta, the wife of the now-Kaiser Wilhelm I. Her monogram also appears on the reverse. The award was instituted in 1871 to commemorate the Franco-Prussian war of 1870/1. The majority of the recipients appear to be royals and the wives and daughters of the aristocracy; also honoured were women who had cared for the wounded during the war.

The full list of recipients can be viewed here.

Miss L. C. Berger and an unidentified woman (possibly Miss M. Wilzinski) sparring in Chicago, 1902.
Chicago Daily News photograph

Miss L. C. Berger and an unidentified woman (possibly Miss M. Wilzinski) sparring in Chicago, 1902.

Chicago Daily News photograph

"The most prevailing incentive to labor was to secure the means of education for some male member of the family. To make a gentleman of a brother or a son, to give him a college education, was the dominant thought in the minds of a great many of the better class of mill­girls. I have known more than one to give every cent of her wages, month after month, to her brother, that he might get the education necessary to enter some profession. I have known a mother to work years in this way for her boy. I have known women to educate young men by their earnings, who were not sons or relatives. There are many men now living who were helped to an education by the wages of the early mill­girls."

Harriet Hanson Robinson, the wife of a newspaper editor and Lowell Mill Girl from the age of ten in 1834 to 1848.

(Source: fordham.edu)

todaysdocument:

Written on April 13, 1989, this letter was sent from second-grader Kelli Middlestead of the Franklin School in Burlingame, California, to Walter Stieglitz the Regional Director of the Alaska Region of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, lamenting the Exxon Valdez oil spill of March 24, 1989.

Newsgirl, Park Row NYC, 1910.

Newsgirl, Park Row NYC, 1910.

frenchhistory:


Costume de sirène pour Mlle Guimard (Le Ballet des sens, Jean-Joseph Mouret)
Dessins et croquis de costumes pour les opéras représentés à Paris et à Versailles de 1739 à 1767
Louis-René Boquet (1717-1814), 1770.
BnF, Manuscrits, Rothschild 1462, n° 93
@credits

Marie-Madeleine Guimard was a French ballerina who dominated the Parisian stage during the reign of Louis XVI. For twenty-five years she was the star of the Paris Opera. She made herself even more famous by her love affairs, especially by her long liaison with the prince de Soubise. According to Edmond de Goncourt, when d’Alembert was asked why dancers like La Guimard made such prodigious fortunes, when singers did not, he responded, “It is a necessary consequence of the laws of motion”

frenchhistory:

Costume de sirène pour Mlle Guimard (Le Ballet des sens, Jean-Joseph Mouret)
Dessins et croquis de costumes pour les opéras représentés à Paris et à Versailles de 1739 à 1767
Louis-René Boquet (1717-1814), 1770.
BnF, Manuscrits, Rothschild 1462, n° 93

@credits

Marie-Madeleine Guimard was a French ballerina who dominated the Parisian stage during the reign of Louis XVI. For twenty-five years she was the star of the Paris Opera. She made herself even more famous by her love affairs, especially by her long liaison with the prince de Soubise. According to Edmond de Goncourt, when d’Alembert was asked why dancers like La Guimard made such prodigious fortunes, when singers did not, he responded, “It is a necessary consequence of the laws of motion”

aat
fuckyeahlatinamericanhistory:


This Costa Rican postage stamp features Francisca “Pancha” Carrasco (1828-1890), notable for her participation in the Second Battle of Rivas of 1856, when she became one of her country’s earliest woman soldiers.

aat

fuckyeahlatinamericanhistory:

This Costa Rican postage stamp features Francisca “Pancha” Carrasco (1828-1890), notable for her participation in the Second Battle of Rivas of 1856, when she became one of her country’s earliest woman soldiers.

(via fylatinamericanhistory)

Canaries who live aboard Ambulance Train to cheer wounded with song

Canaries who live aboard Ambulance Train to cheer wounded with song

"I choose to study medicine because I realise only too well the moral impact one has as doctor on a female patient. While one soothes their physical suffering, women open their heart to you. I see medicine as a way to help women get out of their dull resignation, to get them to help each other and make them stronger so that they will demand that which they have a right to."

— Isala Van Diest (1842-1916), the first female physician in Belgium

(Source: flanderstoday.eu)

Minneapolis Park Board girls rifle team, circa 1920.

Minneapolis Park Board girls rifle team, circa 1920.

Have you ever poured syrup in the snow to make candy?  Did you ever wish you had a light blue calling card?  Have you ever contemplated ”Manly” as a boyfriend nickname?  If so, I have a book suggestion for you: The Wilder Life by Wendy McClure.
The Wilder Life follows BUST columnist and Little House fanatic Wendy McClure as she visits the sites from Laura’s life.  It is equal parts fandom memoir and travelogue, a project book with the author revisiting Laura’s life through visits to the homesteads and pioneer activities.  Reading The Wilder Life inspired me to reread several of the original books, noticing things that I’d skipped over as a child.
While I enjoyed the book, I think those who were children in the 70s might enjoy it a bit more as the author was also a child during the 70s Laura revival.  I actually saw the TV show in reruns before I read the books, so my perspective is a bit different.  

Have you ever poured syrup in the snow to make candy?  Did you ever wish you had a light blue calling card?  Have you ever contemplated ”Manly” as a boyfriend nickname?  If so, I have a book suggestion for you: The Wilder Life by Wendy McClure.

The Wilder Life follows BUST columnist and Little House fanatic Wendy McClure as she visits the sites from Laura’s life.  It is equal parts fandom memoir and travelogue, a project book with the author revisiting Laura’s life through visits to the homesteads and pioneer activities.  Reading The Wilder Life inspired me to reread several of the original books, noticing things that I’d skipped over as a child.

While I enjoyed the book, I think those who were children in the 70s might enjoy it a bit more as the author was also a child during the 70s Laura revival.  I actually saw the TV show in reruns before I read the books, so my perspective is a bit different.  

Easter Egg Rolling at the White House, 1921.

Easter Egg Rolling at the White House, 1921.