University of Chicago co-eds Marian McKenney, Jane Brady, and Natalie Stern, 1935.

University of Chicago co-eds Marian McKenney, Jane Brady, and Natalie Stern, 1935.

"I remember telephoning Robin Hankey, the secretary at the embassy in Warsaw, and saying, ‘The war’s begun’. He said, ‘Rubbish, they’re still negotiating’. And I said, ‘Can’t you hear it?’ So I hung the telephone out the window so he could listen to the Germans invading."

— Clare Hollingworth, the first journalist to report the outbreak of World War II

(Source: telegraph.co.uk)

Woman’s rights meeting, Tokyo 

Woman’s rights meeting, Tokyo 

publicaffairsbooks:

On this Administrative Professionals’ Day, a photo of our author Lynn Povich—who became the first woman senior editor at Newsweek—back when she was a researcher in the Paris office. Lynn’s book, The Good Girls Revolt: How the Women of Newsweek Sued their Bosses and Changed the Workplace, comes out in September.

publicaffairsbooks:

On this Administrative Professionals’ Day, a photo of our author Lynn Povich—who became the first woman senior editor at Newsweek—back when she was a researcher in the Paris office. Lynn’s book, The Good Girls Revolt: How the Women of Newsweek Sued their Bosses and Changed the Workplace, comes out in September.

There is framed photo of suffragette Helen Hitchcock over Sue Wilson’s desk on Veep.

That photo was one of my first Cool Chicks from History posts and it is originally from the Library of Congress.  I’m impressed by the set decoration.  Massive thanks to quatre1six for the screenshot!  

Can anybody get a screenshot?

In the first episode of Veep, I think it looks like this photo of suffragette Helen Hitchcock is posted next to the VP’s door/over the black female staffer’s desk.

Am I right?  

Vienna’s pedestrian-only zones are guarded by policewomen
July 1973

Vienna’s pedestrian-only zones are guarded by policewomen

July 1973

Wilhelmina Drucker, Dutch women’s rights pioneer, sitting for a portrait with Truus Claes in 1917 on the occasion of her seventieth birthday.
Dutch women’s rights group Dolla Mina derived its name from Wilhelmina’s nickname.  

Wilhelmina Drucker, Dutch women’s rights pioneer, sitting for a portrait with Truus Claes in 1917 on the occasion of her seventieth birthday.

Dutch women’s rights group Dolla Mina derived its name from Wilhelmina’s nickname.  

College Girls is a light cultural history of women’s higher education in the US.  Organized by topic rather than chronologically, the book focuses on how dating, fashion, and wifely expectations impacted the lives of college girls from the 1830s through the 1960s.  A good mix of colleges are represented, from land grant colleges to historically black universities, but particular attention is paid to the seven sisters as both models for later programs and havens of wacky traditions.   
Tumblr loves vintage images of women from the 1920s-1960s, but there isn’t a lot of information about what life was like for those women.  I think this weighty tome (over 400 pages) would be particularly enjoyed by those who have daydreamed about being a stylish co-ed back in the day.  Partly for the fashion information and cute traditions, but also to better understand the downsides of life as a Victorian lady, flapper, or bobbysoxer. 

College Girls is a light cultural history of women’s higher education in the US.  Organized by topic rather than chronologically, the book focuses on how dating, fashion, and wifely expectations impacted the lives of college girls from the 1830s through the 1960s.  A good mix of colleges are represented, from land grant colleges to historically black universities, but particular attention is paid to the seven sisters as both models for later programs and havens of wacky traditions.   

Tumblr loves vintage images of women from the 1920s-1960s, but there isn’t a lot of information about what life was like for those women.  I think this weighty tome (over 400 pages) would be particularly enjoyed by those who have daydreamed about being a stylish co-ed back in the day.  Partly for the fashion information and cute traditions, but also to better understand the downsides of life as a Victorian lady, flapper, or bobbysoxer. 

Girls at the University of Chicago learn Jiu-jitsu, 1943.

Girls at the University of Chicago learn Jiu-jitsu, 1943.

yeoldefashion:

At first glance this 1905 evening gown designed by Lucile and entitled ‘A Protest’ appears to be just a pretty dress, if not with a slightly unusual name and color combination. The whole truth is far more interesting.
I wrote a while back about the Victorian practice of using different colors or gemstones to spell out messages in jewelry. This dress uses the same practice on a larger scale.
The color combination of (g)reen, (w)hite and (v)iolet would have sent a very specific message to any one in the know.
Specifically: (G)ive (W)omen the (V)ote.
This is a suffragette ball gown!

Lucile was the professional name of Lucy, Lady Duff-Gordon.

yeoldefashion:

At first glance this 1905 evening gown designed by Lucile and entitled ‘A Protest’ appears to be just a pretty dress, if not with a slightly unusual name and color combination. The whole truth is far more interesting.

I wrote a while back about the Victorian practice of using different colors or gemstones to spell out messages in jewelry. This dress uses the same practice on a larger scale.

The color combination of (g)reen, (w)hite and (v)iolet would have sent a very specific message to any one in the know.

Specifically: (G)ive (W)omen the (V)ote.

This is a suffragette ball gown!

Lucile was the professional name of Lucy, Lady Duff-Gordon.

Canadian steampunk author Jordan Stratford put together a $4,000 Kickstarter fundraiser for his tween mystery about Ada Lovelace and Mary Shelley.  To date he has raised over $70,000.  Still worth contributing if you’d be interested in receiving the book.

Thanks to willowisps chopsticks for the suggestion.

Places to See: Titanic

Permanent Exhibits:

Connecticut: Mystic Aquarium

Denver: Molly Brown House Museum

England: SeaCity Museum  

Massachusetts: Titanic Museum

Missouri: Titanic Branson

Northern Ireland: Titanic Belfast

Nova Scotia: Maritime Museum of the Atlantic and other locations of interest

Tennessee: Titanic Pigeon Forge

Temporary Exhibits:

British Columbia: Surrey Museum until June 12, 2012 and Vancouver Maritime Museum until July 8, 2012 

DC: National Geographic until July 8, 2012 and National Postal Museum until January 6, 2014

Houston: Houston Museum of Natural Science May 16 to September 3, 2012

Kansas City: Union Station until September 12, 2012

Las Vegas: Luxor

Michigan: Henry Ford Museum until September 30, 2012

NYC: South Street Seaport until May 16, 2012

Orlando: Titanic: The Experience

Philadelphia: Widener Art Gallery until May 12, 2012 and The Franklin Institute November 10, 2012 to April 7, 2013

San Diego: San Diego Natural History Museum until September 9, 2012

Singapore: ArtScience Museum until April 29, 2012

South Australia: South Australian Maritime Museum until October 2012

South Carolina: South Carolina State Museum May 5 to September 3, 2012

Sydney: Australian National Maritime Museum until November 11, 2012

Lucy, Lady Duff-Gordon circa 1916.
Known professionally as Lucile, Lucy was a leading fashion designer at the turn of the century and the first English designer to achieve international fame.  She is credited with training the first fashion models and her work was popular with film stars such as Mary Pickford.  
By 1912, Lucile was a transatlantic operation and Lucy boarded the Titanic in order to visit her New York boutique.  Lucy, her husband, and her secretary all survived the sinking and were later accused of bribing their lifeboat crew to stay at a distance from the ship and survivors in the water.  They were cleared of wrongdoing by the Board of Trade inquiry.
More about Lucy:
Titanic Survivors Vindicated at Last, The Telegraph (UK)
Lucile Lingerie, run by one of her descendants 
Voyagers of the Titanic: Passengers, Sailors, Shipbuilders, Aristocrats, and the Worlds They Came From on Amazon

Lucy, Lady Duff-Gordon circa 1916.

Known professionally as Lucile, Lucy was a leading fashion designer at the turn of the century and the first English designer to achieve international fame.  She is credited with training the first fashion models and her work was popular with film stars such as Mary Pickford.  

By 1912, Lucile was a transatlantic operation and Lucy boarded the Titanic in order to visit her New York boutique.  Lucy, her husband, and her secretary all survived the sinking and were later accused of bribing their lifeboat crew to stay at a distance from the ship and survivors in the water.  They were cleared of wrongdoing by the Board of Trade inquiry.

More about Lucy:

Titanic Survivors Vindicated at Last, The Telegraph (UK)

Lucile Lingerie, run by one of her descendants 

Voyagers of the Titanic: Passengers, Sailors, Shipbuilders, Aristocrats, and the Worlds They Came From on Amazon

Memorial to Edith Corse Evans at Grace Church in New York City via Scouting NY.  Another plaque honoring Edith Corse Evans can be found at Saint Ann’s Episcopal Church in Sayville, New York.
A wealthy, single socialite, Edith was 36 years old when she boarded the Titanic.  On board she befriended a 59 year old wife and mother named Caroline Brown.  
The two women were among the throng trying to reach a lifeboat as the Titanic sank.  When only one space remained, Edith pushed Caroline forward saying “You go first, you have children waiting at home.”  
Edith was one of four first class women to perish in the sinking of the Titanic.  Her body has never been recovered.

Memorial to Edith Corse Evans at Grace Church in New York City via Scouting NY.  Another plaque honoring Edith Corse Evans can be found at Saint Ann’s Episcopal Church in Sayville, New York.

A wealthy, single socialite, Edith was 36 years old when she boarded the Titanic.  On board she befriended a 59 year old wife and mother named Caroline Brown.  

The two women were among the throng trying to reach a lifeboat as the Titanic sank.  When only one space remained, Edith pushed Caroline forward saying “You go first, you have children waiting at home.”  

Edith was one of four first class women to perish in the sinking of the Titanic.  Her body has never been recovered.