americanexperiencepbs:

A preview of Annie Oakley, broadcasting tonight on PBS!

Ladies ticket to the Great Exhibition at the Crystal Palace, then in Hyde Park.  The Exhibition ran from May 1, 1851 to October 15, 1851.  Designed by Prince Albert to highlight British culture and industry, the exhibit also included displays from Britain’s colonial territories and sovereign nations such as the US and France. 
The price of admission was initially £3 for gentlemen and £2 for ladies.  In today’s money, that would be about £327 for gentlemen and £218 for ladies.  Beginning on May 24th, admission was reduced to one shilling per person (around £5.45 in today’s money), putting the exhibit with the reach of the working classes.

Ladies ticket to the Great Exhibition at the Crystal Palace, then in Hyde Park.  The Exhibition ran from May 1, 1851 to October 15, 1851.  Designed by Prince Albert to highlight British culture and industry, the exhibit also included displays from Britain’s colonial territories and sovereign nations such as the US and France. 

The price of admission was initially £3 for gentlemen and £2 for ladies.  In today’s money, that would be about £327 for gentlemen and £218 for ladies.  Beginning on May 24th, admission was reduced to one shilling per person (around £5.45 in today’s money), putting the exhibit with the reach of the working classes.

todaysdocument:

Presented to Congress on January 29, 1866, signers of this Petition for Universal Suffrage included pioneer suffragists Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and members of the former Women’s  Loyal National League, Ernestine Rose, Lucy Stone, and Antoinette Brown  Blackwell. This exceptional combination of signatures represents some of  the period’s foremost advocates for suffrage and abolition.

todaysdocument:

Presented to Congress on January 29, 1866, signers of this Petition for Universal Suffrage included pioneer suffragists Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and members of the former Women’s Loyal National League, Ernestine Rose, Lucy Stone, and Antoinette Brown Blackwell. This exceptional combination of signatures represents some of the period’s foremost advocates for suffrage and abolition.

Diver Pat McCormick won gold in both platform and springboard diving in the 1952 and 1956 Olympics.

Diver Pat McCormick won gold in both platform and springboard diving in the 1952 and 1956 Olympics.

questionableadvice:

~ The Chicago Blue Book, 1908via Internet ArchiveA female private detective in 1908? Miss Cora M. Strayer, I lift my glass to you. I’ll bet you were an interesting person to know.Note: Apparently Mr. Geo. S. Holben, Supt. Criminal Dept., was shot by a disgruntled former employee in 1910. (Los Angeles Herald, December 06, 1910). According to the 1913 edition of the Chicago Blue Book, Miss. Strayer’s Detective Agency was still in business, although Mr. Holben’s name no longer appeared in the advertisement.

Someone has put together a timeline of Cora’s life, from her birth in Indiana to her creation of a woman’s cavalry unit to her golden years as a lady detective.

questionableadvice:

~ The Chicago Blue Book, 1908
via Internet Archive

A female private detective in 1908? Miss Cora M. Strayer, I lift my glass to you. I’ll bet you were an interesting person to know.

Note: Apparently Mr. Geo. S. Holben, Supt. Criminal Dept., was shot by a disgruntled former employee in 1910. (Los Angeles Herald, December 06, 1910).

According to the 1913 edition of the Chicago Blue Book, Miss. Strayer’s Detective Agency was still in business, although Mr. Holben’s name no longer appeared in the advertisement.

Someone has put together a timeline of Cora’s life, from her birth in Indiana to her creation of a woman’s cavalry unit to her golden years as a lady detective.

Today is International Holocaust Remembrance Day

I put up a couple of Holocaust posts today (unidentified photos, an interview with a survivor) that you can see on my blog.  There are also some interesting related posts in the history tag.  

If you’re looking for a movie to watch, try the documentary Hiding and Seeking on Netflix Instant.  

"She did the Secretary of State job, she was a G, she held it down, she didn’t cry."

Remember Me? Photos from Kloster Inderdorf

Earlier I posted about the US Holocaust Memorial Museum’s project to identify photos of children displaced by World War II.  A subset of the Remember Me? photos were taken at Kloster Inderdorf, a former monastery in Bavaria near Dachau.  In these photos the children hold placards with their names so that surviving family members might be able to recognize them.

The Children’s Center at Kloster Interhofen was established by the UN’s Relief and Rehabilitation Administration to house homeless non-German children after the war.  Most but not all of the children at the center were Jewish. For example, Jadwiga Szulikowska was separated from her mother, a Polish forced laborer, during the bombing of Munich.  

The US Holocaust Memorial Museum is actively looking for information about the children pictured.  A complete list of the Remember Me? children can be found here.

A reunion of those who lived at Kloster Inderdorf after World War II is planned for July 2012.

Sara Gliksman describes being hidden during the Holocaust by the Fink family in Poland.  

In Polish with English subtitles from the Museum of the History of Polish Jews.

January 27th is International Holocaust Remembrance Day

The Remember Me? Project

The US Holocaust Memorial Museum has over 1,000 photos of children displaced by World War II which they are trying to connect to survivors.  The Museum hopes to collect stories about these children and their post-war lives.  A small number of photos have been connected to survivors already.  

The six girls pictured above have not yet been found: Jeanine Cohen, Rosa BerenblumMicheline SuhamiMathilde ErlichMiryam Dzialowski, and Eva Steiner.

Rosalynn Carter chairs mental health hearings, 01/17/1978

Rosalynn Carter chairs mental health hearings, 01/17/1978

Sea animal trainer Dorothy Berg, 1960

Sea animal trainer Dorothy Berg, 1960

The Chrisman Sisters on a claim in Goheen settlement on Lieban (Lillian) Creek, Custer County, Nebraska.  From left to right  Hattie, Lizzie, Lutie, and Ruth.
Lizzie Chrisman filed the first of the sisters’ homestead claims in 1887 while Lutie filed the following year.  Because of age restrictions on homesteaders, Ruth and Hattie waited until 1892 to file their claims. 
Many homesteaders found that a single claim could not sustain a family, so combining resources was a good solution. Together, the Chrisman sisters’ claims totaled 1,920 acres. The sisters took turns living with each other in order to fulfill the five-year residency requirement without living alone.

The Chrisman Sisters on a claim in Goheen settlement on Lieban (Lillian) Creek, Custer County, Nebraska.  From left to right  Hattie, Lizzie, Lutie, and Ruth.

Lizzie Chrisman filed the first of the sisters’ homestead claims in 1887 while Lutie filed the following year.  Because of age restrictions on homesteaders, Ruth and Hattie waited until 1892 to file their claims. 

Many homesteaders found that a single claim could not sustain a family, so combining resources was a good solution. Together, the Chrisman sisters’ claims totaled 1,920 acres. The sisters took turns living with each other in order to fulfill the five-year residency requirement without living alone.

atlantahistorycenter:

FROM THE ARCHIVES- Margaret Mitchell’s message to Lois Cole agreeing to sell Gone With the Wind motion picture rights.

atlantahistorycenter:

FROM THE ARCHIVES- Margaret Mitchell’s message to Lois Cole agreeing to sell Gone With the Wind motion picture rights.