Autographed photos of World War I nurses from Ethel Anderson’s scrapbook (via NYPL)

The front of the Great Seal of Elizabeth I. The Great Seal was used by the Chancery, the Tudor Civil service, to show that the document attached was ordered in the Queen’s name. The pattern for this seal was produced by the artist Nicholas Hilliard in 1586.

The front of the Great Seal of Elizabeth I. The Great Seal was used by the Chancery, the Tudor Civil service, to show that the document attached was ordered in the Queen’s name. The pattern for this seal was produced by the artist Nicholas Hilliard in 1586.

Oksana Omelianchik was a Soviet gymnast.  She won the all around gold medal in the 1985 World Gymnastics Championships.  Oksana remains involved in gymnastics as a coach, choreographer and judge.

(Source: gymnasticsgifs)

Free Milk for France Parade, Washington D.C., 1918

Images via the Library of Congress

Free Milk for France was a response to the agricultural devastation created by World War I.  Founded by a small group of New York women, branches were eventually created in 38 states by locally prominent women.

Free Milk for France shipped powdered milk to France where it was distributed by the government and government authorized facilities to children, the elderly, the sick, and nursing/pregnant women.  The US government contributed $9,623.87 ($143,363.16 in today’s money) collected in fines from war profiteers.

Sister Gaume, Sister Superior of an orphanage in the Belleville quarter of Paris wrote on receiving the milk:

This precious milk is used for the orphans, for tired or old sisters, for young mothers who nurse their babies, for quite small children, for the tubercular, for the convalescent, for the people who are left destitute by the war and hide their misery… Your splendid gift is thus very much appreciated.  It is very useful and we will never forget it.

The Siege of Sarajevo is the longest siege of a capital city in the history of modern warfare, lasting three times longer than the Siege of Stalingrad.  Part of the larger Bosnian War, the city was under assault from Serbian forces from 1992 to 1996.  Around 10,000 civilians were killed and a further 50,000 were seriously wounded. 
In September 1991, ten year old Sarajevan Zlata Filipović began keeping a diary. Over the next two years, Zlata became accustomed to regular shelling, a lack of food, intermittent utilities, and pervasive fear. 
Zlata has been called the Bosnian Anne Frank, but that isn’t quite accurate.  While both Anne and Zlata spent the bulk of their time in a tiny space, their fears were different.  Zlata feared a shell breaking through the glass of her windows rather than discovery by genocidal soldiers.   Zlata was clearly aware of Anne Frank and after the beginning of fighting decided to name her diary as Anne did.  Excerpts from Zlata’s diary were published as she was writing, making her minor celebrity in the early 1990s. 
Zlata’s Diary is an interesting primary source from a child living in a war zone.  Completed nearly 20 years ago, Zlata isn’t all that different from today’s tweens.  She likes pop music and high fashion models, she records her grades, the presents she receives, and the top songs on MTV along with details of nights spent in the cellar as the fighting continues.  I’d recommend this book to anyone interested in the Balkans or life in a conflict zone.  It also makes an interesting companion to The Diary of Anne Frank.

The Siege of Sarajevo is the longest siege of a capital city in the history of modern warfare, lasting three times longer than the Siege of Stalingrad.  Part of the larger Bosnian War, the city was under assault from Serbian forces from 1992 to 1996.  Around 10,000 civilians were killed and a further 50,000 were seriously wounded. 

In September 1991, ten year old Sarajevan Zlata Filipović began keeping a diary. Over the next two years, Zlata became accustomed to regular shelling, a lack of food, intermittent utilities, and pervasive fear. 

Zlata has been called the Bosnian Anne Frank, but that isn’t quite accurate.  While both Anne and Zlata spent the bulk of their time in a tiny space, their fears were different.  Zlata feared a shell breaking through the glass of her windows rather than discovery by genocidal soldiers.   Zlata was clearly aware of Anne Frank and after the beginning of fighting decided to name her diary as Anne did.  Excerpts from Zlata’s diary were published as she was writing, making her minor celebrity in the early 1990s. 

Zlata’s Diary is an interesting primary source from a child living in a war zone.  Completed nearly 20 years ago, Zlata isn’t all that different from today’s tweens.  She likes pop music and high fashion models, she records her grades, the presents she receives, and the top songs on MTV along with details of nights spent in the cellar as the fighting continues.  I’d recommend this book to anyone interested in the Balkans or life in a conflict zone.  It also makes an interesting companion to The Diary of Anne Frank.

Caroline, 6, and her mother, Mrs. Marie Auclair of West New York, N.J., are properly equipped with Erin Go Bragh banners to cheer marchers as they pass their spot at 49th St. 
1953

Caroline, 6, and her mother, Mrs. Marie Auclair of West New York, N.J., are properly equipped with Erin Go Bragh banners to cheer marchers as they pass their spot at 49th St. 

1953

thebostonglobe:


While Navy sailors transport gear from their landing craft to shore, an Army nurse wades ashore with her G.I. shoes slung around her neck and her coveralls rolled above her knees. Naples Harbor, Italy. 11/5/45

thebostonglobe:

While Navy sailors transport gear from their landing craft to shore, an Army nurse wades ashore with her G.I. shoes slung around her neck and her coveralls rolled above her knees. Naples Harbor, Italy. 11/5/45

Irish Hospital Sweepstakes parade through Dublin in late March 1935. Before every drawing, there was a parade through the city, with all of the tickets carried in the boxes you can see in this photo.  A Flickr user placed this photo on Middle Abbey Street.
The Irish Hospital Sweepstakes was created by the Irish Free State in 1930 to raise money for medical care.  The Irish Sweepstakes was hugely popular in the UK, the US and Canada, despite the fact that the tickets were not legally sold outside of Ireland.  US Customs confiscated millions of tickets and Anglo-Irish relations became strained over the amount of money leaving the UK.  The Irish Sweepstakes focused heavily on the American market and the Irish diaspora.  At the time this photo was taken, 60% of the tickets were sold in the US.   As the UK, US and Canadian governments began to host their own lotteries, the Irish Sweepstakes slowly faded in popularity.  The final Irish Hospital Sweepstakes was held in 1986.

Irish Hospital Sweepstakes parade through Dublin in late March 1935. Before every drawing, there was a parade through the city, with all of the tickets carried in the boxes you can see in this photo.  A Flickr user placed this photo on Middle Abbey Street.

The Irish Hospital Sweepstakes was created by the Irish Free State in 1930 to raise money for medical care.  The Irish Sweepstakes was hugely popular in the UK, the US and Canada, despite the fact that the tickets were not legally sold outside of Ireland.  US Customs confiscated millions of tickets and Anglo-Irish relations became strained over the amount of money leaving the UK.  The Irish Sweepstakes focused heavily on the American market and the Irish diaspora.  At the time this photo was taken, 60% of the tickets were sold in the US.   As the UK, US and Canadian governments began to host their own lotteries, the Irish Sweepstakes slowly faded in popularity.  The final Irish Hospital Sweepstakes was held in 1986.

jessbennett:

newyorker:

From Argentina to Cambodia, Picturing the Disappeared

In this week’s issue, Francisco Goldman writes about the forced disappearance of as many as thirty thousand people by the military junta that ruled Argentina between 1976 and 1983. Artists from across South America have created powerful bodies of work that reflect on these atrocities, which happened throughout the Southern Cone during this era of military dictatorship: citizens were kidnapped, tortured, and murdered by the thousands by their own militaries, and their families were left with no knowledge of their fates.

- On our Photo Booth blog, a selection of photographs from photographers who have worked extensively on the theme of the disappeared: http://nyr.kr/e87pBj

In Argentina, every week the Mothers of the Dissappeared (Madres de los Desaparecidos) still gather in white headscarves and march through the famous downtown Plaza de Mayo.

ourpresidents:

Patricia Nixon’s Centennial Birthday
In 2012 The National Archives and the Presidential Libraries are celebrating the centennials of Patricia Nixon and Lady Bird Johnson.  In the coming year we’ll feature stories and photos about these two women, and celebrate modern American First Ladies.
Here, Pat with children from Washington D.C. on the White House lawn.  One of her initiatives as First Lady was the Summer in the Parks program for D.C. youth.
Patricia Nixon
March 16, 1912 - June 22, 1993

ourpresidents:

Patricia Nixon’s Centennial Birthday

In 2012 The National Archives and the Presidential Libraries are celebrating the centennials of Patricia Nixon and Lady Bird Johnson.  In the coming year we’ll feature stories and photos about these two women, and celebrate modern American First Ladies.

Here, Pat with children from Washington D.C. on the White House lawn.  One of her initiatives as First Lady was the Summer in the Parks program for D.C. youth.

Patricia Nixon

March 16, 1912 - June 22, 1993

Lady Gregory, 1900.
Augusta, Lady Gregory (1852-1932) was an Irish dramatist and folklorist. Born into the Anglo-Irish landlord class, Lady Gregory was a major figure in the revival of traditional Irish culture.  She co-founded the Irish Literary Theatre and the Abbey Theatre with William Butler Yeats and Edward Martyn.  In addition to writing plays for both companies, Lady Gregory produced several books of Irish mythology. 
Coole Park, Lady Gregory’s Galway home, served as a meeting place for such as George Bernard Shaw, John Millington Synge, Sean O’Casey, Robert Browning, Lord Tennyson, and Henry James.  Today Coole Park is a nature reserve open to visitors.  

Lady Gregory, 1900.

Augusta, Lady Gregory (1852-1932) was an Irish dramatist and folklorist. Born into the Anglo-Irish landlord class, Lady Gregory was a major figure in the revival of traditional Irish culture.  She co-founded the Irish Literary Theatre and the Abbey Theatre with William Butler Yeats and Edward Martyn.  In addition to writing plays for both companies, Lady Gregory produced several books of Irish mythology. 

Coole Park, Lady Gregory’s Galway home, served as a meeting place for such as George Bernard Shaw, John Millington Synge, Sean O’Casey, Robert Browning, Lord Tennyson, and Henry James.  Today Coole Park is a nature reserve open to visitors.  

wiscohisto:

Girl Scouts practice archery at Camp Sunset Lake, Portage County, Wisconsin, ca. 1932.
via: McMillan Memorial Library

wiscohisto:

Girl Scouts practice archery at Camp Sunset Lake, Portage County, Wisconsin, ca. 1932.

via: McMillan Memorial Library

ourpresidents:

Fifty years ago, Jacqueline Kennedy went on a goodwill trip to India and Pakistan. Here’s the First Lady at the Taj Mahal, Agra, India. March 15, 1962.  
Photo gallery - Jacqueline Kennedy in India and Pakistan

ourpresidents:

Fifty years ago, Jacqueline Kennedy went on a goodwill trip to India and Pakistan. Here’s the First Lady at the Taj Mahal, Agra, India. March 15, 1962. 

Photo gallery - Jacqueline Kennedy in India and Pakistan


Photographer Elinor Wiltshire captures a very direct stare from a woman shopping on Moore Street, Dublin in 1964.
(The girl in the plaid dress can be seen in another photo from the same day)

Photographer Elinor Wiltshire captures a very direct stare from a woman shopping on Moore Street, Dublin in 1964.

(The girl in the plaid dress can be seen in another photo from the same day)

One Year of Cool Chicks from History!

A total of 1,010 posts with at least one non-reblog post a day.

History Spotlight blog and editor on the History Tag.

On Facebook

The first Cool Chicks from History post (special thanks to those first five likes and reblogs).

Most popular posts: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 (thanks to tumblr radar), 6

Some favorite posts (in no particular order): Nahienaena’s Paū, Swiss SuffragePrincess Elizabeth Bagaya, Roller Derby Queen, Ladybird at HeadstartElizabeth Eckford and Grace Lorch, the 6888thThe O’Halloran Girls, The Wedding of Alberta HillDevi Dja, Febb Burn, Zenobia, CWAC, Dorothy Quick and Mark Twain, Helen Hitchcock, "We had abortions", Ideal, not actual policewoman, Ostriches, all the Freedom Riders

Favorite reblog: Black Flower in the White House