Photograph of Anahareo from Pilgrims of the Wild by Grey Owl (1935) via Project Gutenberg.
Anahareo (Gertrude Bernard) was born into Mohawk family in Ontario.  At age 19, she took a waitressing job in Temagami, ON where she met a 37 year old trapper named Grey Owl (Archibald Belaney).  Grey Owl was an Englishman who had been adopted into the Ojibwe.  During his lifetime, he was believed to be half Apache based on the fictional identity he created for himself.
The couple married in an Anishinaabe ceremony but never legally married as Grey Owl was already married to an Ojibwe woman.  During the eight years of their on and off relationship, Anahareo convinced Grey Owl that trapping was inhumane.  Grey Owl soon became a well known advocate of conservation, always ascribing his change of heart to Anahareo’s influence.
The couple split in 1936 and Grey Owl died two years later.  Newspapers soon exposed Grey Owl’s non-Native origins, damaging his reputation as a conservationist.  Anahareo remained active in conservation and animal rights causes for the rest of her life.  In 1972 she published Devil in Deerskins: My Life with Grey Owl (Amazon).

Photograph of Anahareo from Pilgrims of the Wild by Grey Owl (1935) via Project Gutenberg.

Anahareo (Gertrude Bernard) was born into Mohawk family in Ontario.  At age 19, she took a waitressing job in Temagami, ON where she met a 37 year old trapper named Grey Owl (Archibald Belaney).  Grey Owl was an Englishman who had been adopted into the Ojibwe.  During his lifetime, he was believed to be half Apache based on the fictional identity he created for himself.

The couple married in an Anishinaabe ceremony but never legally married as Grey Owl was already married to an Ojibwe woman.  During the eight years of their on and off relationship, Anahareo convinced Grey Owl that trapping was inhumane.  Grey Owl soon became a well known advocate of conservation, always ascribing his change of heart to Anahareo’s influence.

The couple split in 1936 and Grey Owl died two years later.  Newspapers soon exposed Grey Owl’s non-Native origins, damaging his reputation as a conservationist.  Anahareo remained active in conservation and animal rights causes for the rest of her life.  In 1972 she published Devil in Deerskins: My Life with Grey Owl (Amazon).