Dolores Elizabeth “Lola” Chávez de Armijo (1858-1929)
Art by Andy Purviance (tumblr)
Lola was New Mexico’s State Librarian until the state’s first governor attempted to replace her with a political crony in 1912.  The governor was a Democrat and it was customary for new appointments to be made when the administration changed.  After his first is first nominee, Mary Victory, was rejected by the Republican chair of the Committee on Executive Communication, the governor changed tactics and claimed women did not have the right to hold office under the constitution and laws of New Mexico.  Lola took him to court in 1913 and the New Mexico Supreme Court found in her favor.  Soon after, the legislature passed a law allowing women to hold any appointed office.
A marker outside Albuquerque commemorates Lola’s groundbreaking achievement.  

Dolores Elizabeth “Lola” Chávez de Armijo (1858-1929)

Art by Andy Purviance (tumblr)

Lola was New Mexico’s State Librarian until the state’s first governor attempted to replace her with a political crony in 1912.  The governor was a Democrat and it was customary for new appointments to be made when the administration changed.  After his first is first nominee, Mary Victory, was rejected by the Republican chair of the Committee on Executive Communication, the governor changed tactics and claimed women did not have the right to hold office under the constitution and laws of New Mexico.  Lola took him to court in 1913 and the New Mexico Supreme Court found in her favor.  Soon after, the legislature passed a law allowing women to hold any appointed office.

A marker outside Albuquerque commemorates Lola’s groundbreaking achievement.