Japanese suffragists, 1927.

Japanese suffragists, 1927.

c. 1920 Suffrage FlyerMissouri Historical Society Collections

c. 1920 
Suffrage Flyer
Missouri Historical Society Collections

Start of girls race, Ice carnival on Reflecting Pool in Washington, DC.
February 4, 1925

Start of girls race, Ice carnival on Reflecting Pool in Washington, DC.

February 4, 1925

Girls from Keiths enjoy 1st real snow of season
January 3, 1925

Girls from Keiths enjoy 1st real snow of season

January 3, 1925

uspsstamps:

It’s Women’s Equality Day. On this day in 1920, the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, which granted women the right to vote, went into effect. Today we celebrate this historic milestone, as well as ongoing efforts toward full equality.

uspsstamps:

It’s Women’s Equality Day. On this day in 1920, the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, which granted women the right to vote, went into effect. Today we celebrate this historic milestone, as well as ongoing efforts toward full equality.

Tennis champion Molla Bjurstedt Mallory, 1922.

Tennis champion Molla Bjurstedt Mallory, 1922.

National Woman’s Party group
September 6, 1922
After the passage of the 19th Amendment in 1920, the National Woman’s Party turned its attention to eliminating other forms of gender discrimination through the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA).  The ERA never passed, but many of its goals were achieved by the Equal Pay Act of 1963 and the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

National Woman’s Party group

September 6, 1922

After the passage of the 19th Amendment in 1920, the National Woman’s Party turned its attention to eliminating other forms of gender discrimination through the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA).  The ERA never passed, but many of its goals were achieved by the Equal Pay Act of 1963 and the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

July 4, 1923
Takoma Park, MD

July 4, 1923

Takoma Park, MD

Greek maidens playing ball in the Oregon State University May Day Pageant, 1920s

Greek maidens playing ball in the Oregon State University May Day Pageant, 1920s

metamuseum:

Margarete Schütte-Lihotsky, Austrian, 1897-2000, Frankfurt Kitchen, 1926-1930, Kitchen cabinetry and stove, Gift of funds from Regis Foundation, 2004.195
The Frankfurt Kitchen, part of an ambitious citywide project to create affordable housing after WWI, was extremely influential throughout Europe into the 1930s and still stands as the epitome of “scientific” organization for the domestic workspace.
City Architect Ernst May hired Schütte-Lihotzky, one of the first female architects in Austria, to design a rationally planned kitchen for 10,000 integrated housing units over a four-year period. She analyzed key principles for household design and labor, and positioned each kitchen element carefully, minimizing unnecessary steps as well as providing labor-saving devices and increasing physical comfort.
The kitchen’s many innovative features included integrated units, continuous work surfaces, a worktable for preparing food under a large window adjacent to the sink (both set at a convenient height for use while seated), as well as storage bins with handles and spouts, an adjustable ceiling light, a movable stool, a concealed pass-through, drop-down ironing board, and cabinetry painted blue, supposedly to repel flies.
 
Jennifer Komar Olivarez
Associate Curator, Decorative Arts, Textiles, and Sculpture Minneapolis Institute of Artshttp://artsmia.org/

metamuseum:

Margarete Schütte-Lihotsky, Austrian, 1897-2000, Frankfurt Kitchen, 1926-1930, Kitchen cabinetry and stove, Gift of funds from Regis Foundation, 2004.195


The Frankfurt Kitchen, part of an ambitious citywide project to create affordable housing after WWI, was extremely influential throughout Europe into the 1930s and still stands as the epitome of “scientific” organization for the domestic workspace.

City Architect Ernst May hired Schütte-Lihotzky, one of the first female architects in Austria, to design a rationally planned kitchen for 10,000 integrated housing units over a four-year period. She analyzed key principles for household design and labor, and positioned each kitchen element carefully, minimizing unnecessary steps as well as providing labor-saving devices and increasing physical comfort.

The kitchen’s many innovative features included integrated units, continuous work surfaces, a worktable for preparing food under a large window adjacent to the sink (both set at a convenient height for use while seated), as well as storage bins with handles and spouts, an adjustable ceiling light, a movable stool, a concealed pass-through, drop-down ironing board, and cabinetry painted blue, supposedly to repel flies.

 

Jennifer Komar Olivarez

Associate Curator, Decorative Arts, Textiles, and Sculpture
Minneapolis Institute of Arts
http://artsmia.org/

wiscohisto:

Sigma Kappa women in fur coats, Madison, Wisconsin ca. 1922.
via: UW-Madison Archives by way of University of Wisconsin Digital Collections

wiscohisto:

Sigma Kappa women in fur coats, Madison, Wisconsin ca. 1922.

via: UW-Madison Archives by way of University of Wisconsin Digital Collections

Ada Blackjack aboard her rescue ship, 1923.
In 1921, 23 year old Alaska Native Ada Blackjack joined an expedition to Wrangel Island north of Siberia as a cook and seamstress.  Ada and four men chosen for their expertise in science and geography survived on the island for over a year before rations ran out.  At that point, three men tried to cross the frozen Chukchi Sea for food while Ada and Lorne Knight, an ailing member of the group, stayed behind.  Lorne died in April 1923.  Ada was rescued in August 1923.  The three men who left to seek help were never heard from again.  Ada lived to age 85, living a quiet life and raising two sons.
The photo above was found on Jennifer Niven’s webpage.  She is the author of Ada BlackJack: A True Story of Survival in the Arctic, the digital edition of which is current $3.03 on Amazon.

Ada Blackjack aboard her rescue ship, 1923.

In 1921, 23 year old Alaska Native Ada Blackjack joined an expedition to Wrangel Island north of Siberia as a cook and seamstress.  Ada and four men chosen for their expertise in science and geography survived on the island for over a year before rations ran out.  At that point, three men tried to cross the frozen Chukchi Sea for food while Ada and Lorne Knight, an ailing member of the group, stayed behind.  Lorne died in April 1923.  Ada was rescued in August 1923.  The three men who left to seek help were never heard from again.  Ada lived to age 85, living a quiet life and raising two sons.

The photo above was found on Jennifer Niven’s webpage.  She is the author of Ada BlackJack: A True Story of Survival in the Arctic, the digital edition of which is current $3.03 on Amazon.

June 13, 1922: Veterans Bureau employee Viola LaLonde and Census Bureau employee Elizabeth Van Tuyl pose beside a Ford automobile before making their cross-country drive from Washington, DC to San Francisco. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Keep in mind, these women crossed the country before the construction of a national highway system.  Forget Econolodges and Denny’s restaurants, they packed their own fuel and food, sleeping in the car.   

Eisenhower drove cross country on the Lincoln Highway in 1919 as part of an army convoy which took four months to cross the country.  The contrast between that experience and his experience driving on the Autobahn during World War II led to Eisenhower’s proposal for a national highway system.  

(via downlookingup)

Recreo (Recreation) by Petrona Viera, circa 1924. 
Museu Nacional de Artes Visuais (MNAV), Montevideo, Uruguay.
The daughter of Uruguayan President Feliciano Viera, Petrona is considered the first female professional painter in Uruguay.  She was part of the Planismo (flat-ism) movement of austere lines and bright colors.  Unlike other artists of her period, Petrona never studied in Europe.  Instead she worked at home with instructors such as Guillermo Laborde.  Deaf from the age of two, Petrona found another way to express herself in art. 
The figures in the painting above are playing "Martín Pescador," a game similar in mechanics but not lyrics to "London Bridge is Falling Down."

Recreo (Recreation) by Petrona Viera, circa 1924. 

Museu Nacional de Artes Visuais (MNAV), Montevideo, Uruguay.

The daughter of Uruguayan President Feliciano Viera, Petrona is considered the first female professional painter in Uruguay.  She was part of the Planismo (flat-ism) movement of austere lines and bright colors.  Unlike other artists of her period, Petrona never studied in Europe.  Instead she worked at home with instructors such as Guillermo Laborde.  Deaf from the age of two, Petrona found another way to express herself in art. 

The figures in the painting above are playing "Martín Pescador," a game similar in mechanics but not lyrics to "London Bridge is Falling Down."