fordlibrarymuseum:

A First Lady Flag

After noticing the national flags flying on diplomats’ cars as they arrived at the White House as well as the American and Presidential flags displayed on the President’s car, Betty Ford had a question: “If the President gets flags, why shouldn’t the First Lady?”

In answer Dick Hartwig, then the head of Mrs. Ford’s Secret Service detail, and Rick Sardo, the White House Marine Corps aide, presented her with this specially designed flag on June 24, 1975. Sarah Brinkerhoff, a friend of Hartwig, handmade the pennant for the First Lady’s limousine.

Made of blue satin and trimmed in white lace with blue and red stars, the flag features a pair of red and white bloomers in the center as a play on Mrs. Ford’s maiden name, Bloomer. White text above the bloomers reads, “Don’t Tread on Me.” The letters “E.R.A.” below stand for the Equal Rights Amendment, an indication of Mrs. Ford’s strong support for the proposed amendment that would have given women equality under law through the United States Constitution.

Although it had been designed for her car Mrs. Ford kept the flag on display on her desk in the East Wing.

Images: Betty Ford’s "Bloomer" flag; Betty Ford proudly displays her flag with Dick Hartwig, Rick Sardo, White House photographer David Hume Kennerly, and East Wing staff members Kaye Pullen and Carolyn Porembka on June 24, 1975 (White House photograph A5197-15A).

fordlibrarymuseum:

A White House Prom
When the Holton-Arms School class of 1975 started planning their prom they turned to classmate Susan Ford for a venue. Their senior prom hosted by Susan on May 31, 1975, would be the first one held at the White House.
The seniors covered the cost of the evening with funds they’d been raising since seventh grade. Prom committee members made tablecloths and put together their own flower arrangements for the dance.
After going through a receiving line in the Grand Hall the 74 seniors and their dates headed to the State Floor. Punch and hors d’oeuvres, including miniature quiche lorraine and pigs-in-a-blanket, were served in the State Dining Room. Dancing took place in the East Room from 8:30 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. Two rock groups, the Outerspace Band and Sandcastle, provided music for the dance.
President and Mrs. Ford did not attend Susan’s prom as they were away on a week-long trip to Europe.
Image: Susan Ford, her classmates, and their dates dance to the music of Sandcastle at the Holton-Arms senior prom (White House photograph A4766-09A).

fordlibrarymuseum:

A White House Prom

When the Holton-Arms School class of 1975 started planning their prom they turned to classmate Susan Ford for a venue. Their senior prom hosted by Susan on May 31, 1975, would be the first one held at the White House.

The seniors covered the cost of the evening with funds they’d been raising since seventh grade. Prom committee members made tablecloths and put together their own flower arrangements for the dance.

After going through a receiving line in the Grand Hall the 74 seniors and their dates headed to the State Floor. Punch and hors d’oeuvres, including miniature quiche lorraine and pigs-in-a-blanket, were served in the State Dining Room. Dancing took place in the East Room from 8:30 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. Two rock groups, the Outerspace Band and Sandcastle, provided music for the dance.

President and Mrs. Ford did not attend Susan’s prom as they were away on a week-long trip to Europe.

Image: Susan Ford, her classmates, and their dates dance to the music of Sandcastle at the Holton-Arms senior prom (White House photograph A4766-09A).


SWINGING IN THE YEAR—Girls from Castelar Elementary School near Chinatown perform Ribbon Dance to mark first day of Chinese New Year.
Los Angeles Times
January 24, 1974

SWINGING IN THE YEAR—Girls from Castelar Elementary School near Chinatown perform Ribbon Dance to mark first day of Chinese New Year.

Los Angeles Times

January 24, 1974

fordlibrarymuseum:

Jeanne Holm, Special Assistant for Women’s Affairs
President Ford appointed Jeanne Holm, Major General USAF (Retired), as Special Assistant to the President for Women on March 8, 1976. She succeeded Patricia S. Lindh, who had resigned to become Deputy Assistant Secretary of State.
 Jeanne Holm enlisted in the armed services during World War II and later became the first woman to attend the Air Command and Staff College. She went on attain the rank of Major General in the Air Force, and at the time of her retirement in June 1975 had the distinction of being the highest ranking woman ever to serve in the U.S. armed forces.As Special Assistant, Holm served as a liaison with women’s organizations and provided the President and White House staff members with advice on legislation, regulations, and executive orders. Her office also developed programs supporting women’s civil rights and encouraged recruitment of women for top-level government positions.

fordlibrarymuseum:

Jeanne Holm, Special Assistant for Women’s Affairs

President Ford appointed Jeanne Holm, Major General USAF (Retired), as Special Assistant to the President for Women on March 8, 1976. She succeeded Patricia S. Lindh, who had resigned to become Deputy Assistant Secretary of State.

Jeanne Holm enlisted in the armed services during World War II and later became the first woman to attend the Air Command and Staff College. She went on attain the rank of Major General in the Air Force, and at the time of her retirement in June 1975 had the distinction of being the highest ranking woman ever to serve in the U.S. armed forces.

As Special Assistant, Holm served as a liaison with women’s organizations and provided the President and White House staff members with advice on legislation, regulations, and executive orders. Her office also developed programs supporting women’s civil rights and encouraged recruitment of women for top-level government positions.

(Source: research.archives.gov)

fordlibrarymuseum:

Showstopper
Betty Ford and comedian Marty Allen grooved to the Marine Band’s rendition of “I Feel the Earth Move.” Everyone else cleared the dance floor for their ten-minute performance.

fordlibrarymuseum:

Showstopper

Betty Ford and comedian Marty Allen grooved to the Marine Band’s rendition of “I Feel the Earth Move.” Everyone else cleared the dance floor for their ten-minute performance.

"The Constitution they wrote was designed to protect the rights of white, male citizens. As there were no black Founding Fathers, there were no founding mothers — a great pity, on both counts. It is not too late to complete the work they left undone. Today, here, we should start to do so."

Shirley Chisholm 

"For the Equal Rights Amendment" 

August 10, 1970

(Source: books.google.com)

ourpresidents:

President Carter views snowman built by Amy Carter and her friends., 01/15/1978.
-from the Carter Library 

ourpresidents:

President Carter views snowman built by Amy Carter and her friends., 01/15/1978.

-from the Carter Library 


Maj. Lorraine R. Johnson, who is fighting attempt to discharge her from the Army Reserve Nurse Corps because she became a mother, shown with son, Tommy, 2.
July 12, 1970
Los Angeles Times

Lorraine had been a member of Army Nurses Corps since 1958 and was only 8 years away from the 20 year requirement for full retirement benefits. Mothers had been banned from service in the Army Reserve Nurse Corps since 1951.  After Lorraine filed her lawsuit, the Army granted her a waiver and she was allowed to remain a member of the Reserve Corps.  By 1975, all branches of the US military lifted their bans on pregnant women and mothers.

Maj. Lorraine R. Johnson, who is fighting attempt to discharge her from the Army Reserve Nurse Corps because she became a mother, shown with son, Tommy, 2.

July 12, 1970

Los Angeles Times

Lorraine had been a member of Army Nurses Corps since 1958 and was only 8 years away from the 20 year requirement for full retirement benefits. Mothers had been banned from service in the Army Reserve Nurse Corps since 1951.  After Lorraine filed her lawsuit, the Army granted her a waiver and she was allowed to remain a member of the Reserve Corps.  By 1975, all branches of the US military lifted their bans on pregnant women and mothers.

Carolyn Steinmetz dressed as a witch for Halloween: Sarasota, Florida.
Circa 1970

Carolyn Steinmetz dressed as a witch for Halloween: Sarasota, Florida.

Circa 1970

leanin:

On This Day in History: Billie Jean King wins the Battle of the Sexes
Forty years ago today, tennis pioneer Billie Jean King defeated self-proclaimed “male chauvinist” Bobby Riggs in one of the most-watched tennis matches in history. King would go on to win 20 Wimbledon titles and fight for equal pay for female athletes.
Photo: Neil Leifer (Sports Illustrated/Getty) 

leanin:

On This Day in History: Billie Jean King wins the Battle of the Sexes

Forty years ago today, tennis pioneer Billie Jean King defeated self-proclaimed “male chauvinist” Bobby Riggs in one of the most-watched tennis matches in history. King would go on to win 20 Wimbledon titles and fight for equal pay for female athletes.

Photo: Neil Leifer (Sports Illustrated/Getty) 

nprfreshair:

Tennis champion Billie Jean King recalls the 1973 Battle of the Sexes against Bobby Riggs, knowing she had to beat him for gender equality:

Remember, Title IX had just passed… it ended up being one of the most important pieces of legislation of the 20th century, particularly for women at the time … I really didn’t want that to be weakened. I thought with Margaret [Court] losing it would be a good chance for some of the people to start jumping on the bandwagon to weaken Title IX, hurt our tour, to hurt women’s sports, the women’s movement … as soon as I found out [Margaret had lost] … I knew I definitely was going to play Bobby Riggs, I did not have a choice. 

image via metro US

nprfreshair:

Tennis champion Billie Jean King recalls the 1973 Battle of the Sexes against Bobby Riggs, knowing she had to beat him for gender equality:

Remember, Title IX had just passed… it ended up being one of the most important pieces of legislation of the 20th century, particularly for women at the time … I really didn’t want that to be weakened. I thought with Margaret [Court] losing it would be a good chance for some of the people to start jumping on the bandwagon to weaken Title IX, hurt our tour, to hurt women’s sports, the women’s movement … as soon as I found out [Margaret had lost] … I knew I definitely was going to play Bobby Riggs, I did not have a choice.

image via metro US

theatlantic:

How the Nixon Administration Tried to Woo Women

In the run-up to the 1972 presidential election, the Republican party had a “woman problem” — or at least, that’s what staffers in the Nixon administration believed. Previously confidential memos released on Wednesday by the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum give a glimpse of top staffers’ anxiety about attracting woman voters. As Barbara Franklin, who was in charge of recruiting more women to high-level positions in government, put it, “Polls show we’re in trouble with women voters. We simply cannot afford a mistake!” The challenge was clear, she said. “We need to create the image that women are very important to the Republican Party.”
Read more. [Image: Derrick Bostrom/Flickr]

theatlantic:

How the Nixon Administration Tried to Woo Women

In the run-up to the 1972 presidential election, the Republican party had a “woman problem” — or at least, that’s what staffers in the Nixon administration believed. Previously confidential memos released on Wednesday by the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum give a glimpse of top staffers’ anxiety about attracting woman voters. As Barbara Franklin, who was in charge of recruiting more women to high-level positions in government, put it, “Polls show we’re in trouble with women voters. We simply cannot afford a mistake!” The challenge was clear, she said. “We need to create the image that women are very important to the Republican Party.”

Read more. [Image: Derrick Bostrom/Flickr]

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 6, 1976: U.S. Naval Academy Begin to Admit Women
On this day in 1976, The United States Naval Academy began to accept women as midshipmen after President Gerald Ford signed a bill that authorized the admission of women to all the service academies.
As a result, the Naval Academy accepted 81 women as midshipmen. Later, in May of 1980, Elizabeth Anne Rowe became the first woman to graduate from the academy. Today, women make up about 20 percent of students at the Naval Academy.
Learn more about the history of women in the Navy with FRONTLINE’s “The Navy Blues.”
Photo: The Class of 1980, shown at their swearing in ceremony in 1976. (United States Naval Academy)

Previous Cool Chicks from History post: The first female seniors at Annapolis

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 6, 1976: U.S. Naval Academy Begin to Admit Women

On this day in 1976, The United States Naval Academy began to accept women as midshipmen after President Gerald Ford signed a bill that authorized the admission of women to all the service academies.

As a result, the Naval Academy accepted 81 women as midshipmen. Later, in May of 1980, Elizabeth Anne Rowe became the first woman to graduate from the academy. Today, women make up about 20 percent of students at the Naval Academy.

Learn more about the history of women in the Navy with FRONTLINE’s “The Navy Blues.”

Photo: The Class of 1980, shown at their swearing in ceremony in 1976. (United States Naval Academy)

Previous Cool Chicks from History post: The first female seniors at Annapolis

nwkarchivist:

30 Years Ago Today, Sally Ride Blasts Into Space & History

From a systems-engineering standpoint, it is easy to identify the point where Sally K. Ride began to leave the rest of the world behind. A flow chart of her life would show the crucial decision coming one day in 1977, when — as a 25-year-old astrophysicist winding up her doctoral work at Stanford University — she spotted an announcement in the campus newspaper about openings in the astronaut program, a career she had never even contemplated for herself. In what once would have been called an epiphany — but she herself would probably describe as a go/no-go decision node — she was up and out of the room before she had finished reading the notice, one of more than 1,000 women and nearly 7,000 men to apply for what would ultimately be the 35 slots in the astronaut class of 1978. Not everyone’s life resolves itself so neatly into yes- or-no decisions, taken in an instant and never looked back upon or regretted, but, if Sally Ride’s life proves anything, it is that the very smart are different from you and me.

Newsweek  June 13, 1983

nwkarchivist:

30 Years Ago Today, Sally Ride Blasts Into Space & History

From a systems-engineering standpoint, it is easy to identify the point where Sally K. Ride began to leave the rest of the world behind. A flow chart of her life would show the crucial decision coming one day in 1977, when — as a 25-year-old astrophysicist winding up her doctoral work at Stanford University — she spotted an announcement in the campus newspaper about openings in the astronaut program, a career she had never even contemplated for herself. In what once would have been called an epiphany — but she herself would probably describe as a go/no-go decision node — she was up and out of the room before she had finished reading the notice, one of more than 1,000 women and nearly 7,000 men to apply for what would ultimately be the 35 slots in the astronaut class of 1978. Not everyone’s life resolves itself so neatly into yes- or-no decisions, taken in an instant and never looked back upon or regretted, but, if Sally Ride’s life proves anything, it is that the very smart are different from you and me.

Newsweek  June 13, 1983


Western Airlines stewardesses picket company ticket counter at L.A. Airport to protest recent firing of a stewardess who was four pounds overweight. From left they are Lorraine Storto (back to camera), Glenrae Jenks, Helen Barrios, Carol Zemke and Lila Lynn.
1974

Weight limits for American flight attendants ended in 1990.

Western Airlines stewardesses picket company ticket counter at L.A. Airport to protest recent firing of a stewardess who was four pounds overweight. From left they are Lorraine Storto (back to camera), Glenrae Jenks, Helen Barrios, Carol Zemke and Lila Lynn.

1974

Weight limits for American flight attendants ended in 1990.