Mayor Tom Bradley stands to the right as Jacqueline Gareau of Canada crosses the finish line. She was the first female to finish the L.A. Marathon. Photo dated: February 19, 1984. 

Mayor Tom Bradley stands to the right as Jacqueline Gareau of Canada crosses the finish line. She was the first female to finish the L.A. Marathon. Photo dated: February 19, 1984. 

Mary Ann Shadd (1823-1893)
Art by Brynne Oster-Bainnson (tumblr)
Mary Ann was the oldest of 13 children born to free parents in Wilmington, Delaware.  For 12 years, she taught black children in Delaware, New York, and Pennsylvania.  In 1850, the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act threatened the rights of free blacks, so Mary Ann and her brother moved to Canada.  They settled in Windsor, Ontario and founded a racially integrated school.  From 1853 to 1857, Mary Ann published The Provincial Freeman weekly, making her the first black woman in North America to publish a newspaper.  Mary Ann eventually moved to Toronto and married a widower named Thomas Cary. 
After her husband’s death, Mary Ann and her children returned to the United States.  During the Civil War, she worked as a recruiting officer for the Union Army in Indiana enlisting black volunteers.  After the war, she returned to teaching and worked at black schools in Wilmington and Washington, DC.  While living in DC, Mary Ann attended Howard University School of Law, graduating at the age of 60.  She was second black woman in the United States to earn a law degree. 
Mary Ann’s former home in the U Street Corridor of Washington, DC is a National Historic Landmark, although it is not open to visitors.  

Mary Ann Shadd (1823-1893)

Art by Brynne Oster-Bainnson (tumblr)

Mary Ann was the oldest of 13 children born to free parents in Wilmington, Delaware.  For 12 years, she taught black children in Delaware, New York, and Pennsylvania.  In 1850, the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act threatened the rights of free blacks, so Mary Ann and her brother moved to Canada.  They settled in Windsor, Ontario and founded a racially integrated school.  From 1853 to 1857, Mary Ann published The Provincial Freeman weekly, making her the first black woman in North America to publish a newspaper.  Mary Ann eventually moved to Toronto and married a widower named Thomas Cary. 

After her husband’s death, Mary Ann and her children returned to the United States.  During the Civil War, she worked as a recruiting officer for the Union Army in Indiana enlisting black volunteers.  After the war, she returned to teaching and worked at black schools in Wilmington and Washington, DC.  While living in DC, Mary Ann attended Howard University School of Law, graduating at the age of 60.  She was second black woman in the United States to earn a law degree

Mary Ann’s former home in the U Street Corridor of Washington, DC is a National Historic Landmark, although it is not open to visitors.  


This smiling competitor at the Scottish Games on Dominion Day demonstrates Canada’s diverse cultures and national unity. Winnipeg, Manitoba.
July 1, 1961
Credit: Library and Archives CanadaCopyright: Government of Canada

Happy Canada Day!

This smiling competitor at the Scottish Games on Dominion Day demonstrates Canada’s diverse cultures and national unity. Winnipeg, Manitoba.

July 1, 1961

Credit: Library and Archives Canada
Copyright: Government of Canada

Happy Canada Day!

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Canada’s First Stewardess
When Julie Garner (later Julie Garner Grant) was hired by Trans-Canada Airlines in 1938 as their first stewardess her role was distinctly different from today’s flight attendants. Besides making sure that her passengers had a drink and a pillow she was responsible for radio communications, monitoring weather patterns, and creating the menu for cross-country flights.
Paid $125 a month, Mrs. Grant also designed the airline’s first stewardess uniform (which she is wearing, above). She was told she could not make it navy blue because pilots wore navy and they did not want to cause confusion. Two years later, she re-designed the uniforms - they became navy blue.
Mrs. Grant, who would occasionally have to wear an oxygen mask in the unpressurized aircraft, died on March 4, 2013 at the age of 103.
Sources: Toronto Globe & Mail and Air Canada (which is what Trans Canada Airlines became)
(Image of Lucile Garner Grant standing with the first president of Trans Canada Airlines, circa 1938, is courtesy of Air Canada)
Other Canadian “firsts”:
Daurene Lewis - Canada’s first Black mayor
Maj. Walter Peters - Canada’s first Black jet pilot
and another former flight attendant, Australian Elaine Swain

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Canada’s First Stewardess

When Julie Garner (later Julie Garner Grant) was hired by Trans-Canada Airlines in 1938 as their first stewardess her role was distinctly different from today’s flight attendants. Besides making sure that her passengers had a drink and a pillow she was responsible for radio communications, monitoring weather patterns, and creating the menu for cross-country flights.

Paid $125 a month, Mrs. Grant also designed the airline’s first stewardess uniform (which she is wearing, above). She was told she could not make it navy blue because pilots wore navy and they did not want to cause confusion. Two years later, she re-designed the uniforms - they became navy blue.

Mrs. Grant, who would occasionally have to wear an oxygen mask in the unpressurized aircraft, died on March 4, 2013 at the age of 103.

Sources: Toronto Globe & Mail and Air Canada (which is what Trans Canada Airlines became)

(Image of Lucile Garner Grant standing with the first president of Trans Canada Airlines, circa 1938, is courtesy of Air Canada)

Other Canadian “firsts”:

Daurene Lewis - Canada’s first Black mayor

Maj. Walter Peters - Canada’s first Black jet pilot

and another former flight attendant, Australian Elaine Swain

pasttensevancouver:

Helena Gutteridge, 1911
Helena Gutteridge was a suffragist from Britain when she came to Vancouver around the time this photo was taken. In contrast to other early Vancouver feminists, Gutteridge was working class and concerned with the impoverishment of working women. One of her projects was the establishment of a toy making cooperative in which women could earn money making toys that were then sold in a store on Granville.
In her work life, Gutteridge was a tailor and deeply involved in the local union movement. In the 1930s, housing became her main issue and her efforts can be seen as spearheading the struggle for social housing that continues today. In 1937, she became the first woman to serve as a Vancouver city alderman.
Source: City of Vancouver Archives #371-2693

pasttensevancouver:

Helena Gutteridge, 1911

Helena Gutteridge was a suffragist from Britain when she came to Vancouver around the time this photo was taken. In contrast to other early Vancouver feminists, Gutteridge was working class and concerned with the impoverishment of working women. One of her projects was the establishment of a toy making cooperative in which women could earn money making toys that were then sold in a store on Granville.

In her work life, Gutteridge was a tailor and deeply involved in the local union movement. In the 1930s, housing became her main issue and her efforts can be seen as spearheading the struggle for social housing that continues today. In 1937, she became the first woman to serve as a Vancouver city alderman.

Source: City of Vancouver Archives #371-2693

Women from the Three Services on Laurentian Weekend.

Women from the Three Services on Laurentian Weekend.


Abby Hoffman-When no female leagues were available to her, Hoffman cut her hair and was registered as a boy “Ab Hoffman” in order to play hockey in the mid 50’s. She was only 8 years old at the time and had everyone convinced she was a male until she participated in an all-star game that required players to submit their birth certificates.
Hoffman was ejected from the league and her story made international news. She later assisted the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association in implementing a national women’s championship, and today, representatives from each province vie for the Abby Hoffman Cup.
Source: penshead.com

Abby Hoffman-When no female leagues were available to her, Hoffman cut her hair and was registered as a boy “Ab Hoffman” in order to play hockey in the mid 50’s. She was only 8 years old at the time and had everyone convinced she was a male until she participated in an all-star game that required players to submit their birth certificates.

Hoffman was ejected from the league and her story made international news. She later assisted the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association in implementing a national women’s championship, and today, representatives from each province vie for the Abby Hoffman Cup.

Source: penshead.com

(Source: classichockeyplayers)

Native women of the Blood Nation (Kainai Blackfoot) dressed in traditional vestments.
1907

Native women of the Blood Nation (Kainai Blackfoot) dressed in traditional vestments.

1907

"Mary Greyeyes being blessed by her native Chief prior to leaving for service in the CWAC."  September 29, 1942.
Mary Greyeyes (Reid) was the first Native woman to join the Canadian Forces and one of only 25 Native women to serve in the Canadian military during World War II.
The photo is staged according to Mary’s daughter in law.  

"Mary Greyeyes being blessed by her native Chief prior to leaving for service in the CWAC."  September 29, 1942.

Mary Greyeyes (Reid) was the first Native woman to join the Canadian Forces and one of only 25 Native women to serve in the Canadian military during World War II.

The photo is staged according to Mary’s daughter in law.  

Photograph of Anahareo from Pilgrims of the Wild by Grey Owl (1935) via Project Gutenberg.
Anahareo (Gertrude Bernard) was born into Mohawk family in Ontario.  At age 19, she took a waitressing job in Temagami, ON where she met a 37 year old trapper named Grey Owl (Archibald Belaney).  Grey Owl was an Englishman who had been adopted into the Ojibwe.  During his lifetime, he was believed to be half Apache based on the fictional identity he created for himself.
The couple married in an Anishinaabe ceremony but never legally married as Grey Owl was already married to an Ojibwe woman.  During the eight years of their on and off relationship, Anahareo convinced Grey Owl that trapping was inhumane.  Grey Owl soon became a well known advocate of conservation, always ascribing his change of heart to Anahareo’s influence.
The couple split in 1936 and Grey Owl died two years later.  Newspapers soon exposed Grey Owl’s non-Native origins, damaging his reputation as a conservationist.  Anahareo remained active in conservation and animal rights causes for the rest of her life.  In 1972 she published Devil in Deerskins: My Life with Grey Owl (Amazon).

Photograph of Anahareo from Pilgrims of the Wild by Grey Owl (1935) via Project Gutenberg.

Anahareo (Gertrude Bernard) was born into Mohawk family in Ontario.  At age 19, she took a waitressing job in Temagami, ON where she met a 37 year old trapper named Grey Owl (Archibald Belaney).  Grey Owl was an Englishman who had been adopted into the Ojibwe.  During his lifetime, he was believed to be half Apache based on the fictional identity he created for himself.

The couple married in an Anishinaabe ceremony but never legally married as Grey Owl was already married to an Ojibwe woman.  During the eight years of their on and off relationship, Anahareo convinced Grey Owl that trapping was inhumane.  Grey Owl soon became a well known advocate of conservation, always ascribing his change of heart to Anahareo’s influence.

The couple split in 1936 and Grey Owl died two years later.  Newspapers soon exposed Grey Owl’s non-Native origins, damaging his reputation as a conservationist.  Anahareo remained active in conservation and animal rights causes for the rest of her life.  In 1972 she published Devil in Deerskins: My Life with Grey Owl (Amazon).

Canadian Women’s Army Corps warming themselves by an outdoor fire circa 1944-1945.

Canadian Women’s Army Corps warming themselves by an outdoor fire circa 1944-1945.

New Roman Catholic saints Marianne Cope (left) and Kateri Tekakwitha, image via Syracuse.com 
Seven new saints were canonized on Sunday in Rome, including the two women shown above.  The other saints canonized were Jacques Berthieu (France/Madagascar), Giovanni Battista Piamarta (Italy), Carmen Salles y Barangueras (Spain), Anna Schaeffer (Germany), and Pedro Calungsod (Philippines).
Marianne Cope carried for leprosy patients in Hawaii.  Kateri Tekakwitha is the first Native American woman to be canonized (previous post).  

New Roman Catholic saints Marianne Cope (left) and Kateri Tekakwitha, image via Syracuse.com 

Seven new saints were canonized on Sunday in Rome, including the two women shown above.  The other saints canonized were Jacques Berthieu (France/Madagascar), Giovanni Battista Piamarta (Italy), Carmen Salles y Barangueras (Spain), Anna Schaeffer (Germany), and Pedro Calungsod (Philippines).

Marianne Cope carried for leprosy patients in Hawaii.  Kateri Tekakwitha is the first Native American woman to be canonized (previous post).  

pasttensevancouver:

Barbara Howard, February 1938
Barbara Howard was once among the fastest women in the world and the first black woman to represent Canada on the international sports stage. At the age of 17, while still a student at Britannia High School, Howard qualified for the 1938 British Empire Games by sprinting 100 yards in 11.2 seconds, a tenth of a second faster than the Games’ record.
After a month-long voyage to get to the games in Sidney, Howard drew much attention from the Australian media and sports fans, according to the Globe:

Barbara Howard, dusky sprinter from B.C., caused quite a stir among Sydney’s populace during her appearance at the Empire games … She apparently was quite a novelty … appearing on the front page of every newspaper. They seldom see colored athletes down there … the photographers and autograph seekers kept on her trail.

Howard placed sixth in the 100 yard dash, but helped bring home silver and bronze medals in two relay races. She felt she let down Canada, so never made a big deal out of the Games when she got home. “I didn’t think I did well,” she said. “It was nothing to be boasting about if I didn’t get the gold medal.” Her plan was to redeem herself at the 1940 Olympics, but those hopes died because the world was at war and the Games were cancelled. With her sports career behind her, Howard completed the teaching program at UBC and became the first visible minority hired by the Vancouver School Board. 
Only recently has Barbara Howard’s pioneering role in sports been recognized. Last month, at the age of 92, she was inducted into the BC Sports Hall of Fame. She is also depicted in a mural commemorating the centenary of her old high school and was awarded the “Freedom of the Municipality” by Belcarra, where she lived for years.
There has been speculation that Howard might be related to Olympians Valerie and Harry Jerome. Maybe, maybe not, but there is definitely one other fleet-footed person in her family. Barbara Howard’s uncle was Elijah “Lige” Scurry, a local lacrosse legend in the 1890s, when it was the most popular sport around. Lige was so fast on the field that Victoria and New Westminster joined forces to impose a “colour bar” on the league, which effectively ended the lacrosse career of the Vancouver team’s best player. For both Lige Scurry and his niece, the journey to their full athletic potential was cut short by circumstances beyond their control.
For more on Barbara Howard, see Tom Hawthorn’s blog. Thanks to John Burwood for spotting the link between Barbara Howard and Elijah Scurry.
Source: City of Vancouver Archives #371-1643

pasttensevancouver:

Barbara Howard, February 1938

Barbara Howard was once among the fastest women in the world and the first black woman to represent Canada on the international sports stage. At the age of 17, while still a student at Britannia High School, Howard qualified for the 1938 British Empire Games by sprinting 100 yards in 11.2 seconds, a tenth of a second faster than the Games’ record.

After a month-long voyage to get to the games in Sidney, Howard drew much attention from the Australian media and sports fans, according to the Globe:

Barbara Howard, dusky sprinter from B.C., caused quite a stir among Sydney’s populace during her appearance at the Empire games … She apparently was quite a novelty … appearing on the front page of every newspaper. They seldom see colored athletes down there … the photographers and autograph seekers kept on her trail.

Howard placed sixth in the 100 yard dash, but helped bring home silver and bronze medals in two relay races. She felt she let down Canada, so never made a big deal out of the Games when she got home. “I didn’t think I did well,” she said. “It was nothing to be boasting about if I didn’t get the gold medal.” Her plan was to redeem herself at the 1940 Olympics, but those hopes died because the world was at war and the Games were cancelled. With her sports career behind her, Howard completed the teaching program at UBC and became the first visible minority hired by the Vancouver School Board. 

Only recently has Barbara Howard’s pioneering role in sports been recognized. Last month, at the age of 92, she was inducted into the BC Sports Hall of Fame. She is also depicted in a mural commemorating the centenary of her old high school and was awarded the “Freedom of the Municipality” by Belcarra, where she lived for years.

There has been speculation that Howard might be related to Olympians Valerie and Harry Jerome. Maybe, maybe not, but there is definitely one other fleet-footed person in her family. Barbara Howard’s uncle was Elijah “Lige” Scurry, a local lacrosse legend in the 1890s, when it was the most popular sport around. Lige was so fast on the field that Victoria and New Westminster joined forces to impose a “colour bar” on the league, which effectively ended the lacrosse career of the Vancouver team’s best player. For both Lige Scurry and his niece, the journey to their full athletic potential was cut short by circumstances beyond their control.

For more on Barbara Howard, see Tom Hawthorn’s blog. Thanks to John Burwood for spotting the link between Barbara Howard and Elijah Scurry.

Source: City of Vancouver Archives #371-1643

Canadian Lori Fung’s ribbon routine at the 1984 Olympics.  Lori won the first ever individual all around gold medal in rhythmic gymnastics.  (The Eastern Bloc countries who normally excel in the sport stayed home rather than compete in Los Angeles)

Canadian diver Sylvie Bernier at the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles where she won a gold medal in the 3m springboard. 

Canadian diver Sylvie Bernier at the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles where she won a gold medal in the 3m springboard.