Jovita Idár (1885-1946)
Art by Best Bitter Comics (tumblr, twitter)
Jovita began her career as a teacher in Laredo in 1903.  Frustrated by the lack of resources provided to the school, she quit teaching and began writing for her father’s newspaper, La Crónica.  Jovita’s writing focused on social justice issues, particularly the economic and structural challenges faced by poor Mexican Americans. 
When her family organized the First Mexican Congress in 1911, Jovita spearheaded the women’s contingent. After the conference, Jovita helped found the League of Mexican Women (La Liga Femenil Mexicanista) which provided free education to Tejano children.
The Idárs supported the Mexican Revolution and in 1913 Jovita travelled south to help the revolutionaries.  She served in Mexico with La Cruz Blanca (the White Cross) caring for the wounded.
In 1917, Jovita married and moved to San Antonio.  She remained active in social justice causes for the rest of her life.

Jovita Idár (1885-1946)

Art by Best Bitter Comics (tumblr, twitter)

Jovita began her career as a teacher in Laredo in 1903.  Frustrated by the lack of resources provided to the school, she quit teaching and began writing for her father’s newspaper, La Crónica.  Jovita’s writing focused on social justice issues, particularly the economic and structural challenges faced by poor Mexican Americans. 

When her family organized the First Mexican Congress in 1911, Jovita spearheaded the women’s contingent. After the conference, Jovita helped found the League of Mexican Women (La Liga Femenil Mexicanista) which provided free education to Tejano children.

The Idárs supported the Mexican Revolution and in 1913 Jovita travelled south to help the revolutionaries.  She served in Mexico with La Cruz Blanca (the White Cross) caring for the wounded.

In 1917, Jovita married and moved to San Antonio.  She remained active in social justice causes for the rest of her life.

ourpresidents:

Diana Vreeland was born on this day, July 29, 1906.
Here, Vreeland gives a tour to First Lady Betty Ford of the “American Women of Style” exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. March 29, 1976.Vreeland, was a prominent fashion journalist and the developer of the show. The show featured the clothing and accessories of ten women noted for their individuality and the impact they had on American style. Those profiled included dancer Isadora Duncan, artist Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, and entertainer Josephine Baker. Sculptures, paintings, and photographs supplemented the garments on display.After the tour Mrs. Ford greeted the Museum and Costume Institute staff who created the exhibit and built the displays.

ourpresidents:

Diana Vreeland was born on this day, July 29, 1906.

Here, Vreeland gives a tour to First Lady Betty Ford of the “American Women of Style” exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. March 29, 1976.

Vreeland, was a prominent fashion journalist and the developer of the show. The show featured the clothing and accessories of ten women noted for their individuality and the impact they had on American style. Those profiled included dancer Isadora Duncan, artist Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, and entertainer Josephine Baker. Sculptures, paintings, and photographs supplemented the garments on display.

After the tour Mrs. Ford greeted the Museum and Costume Institute staff who created the exhibit and built the displays.
President Lyndon B. Johnson holding a Press Conference in the White House Oval Office, Helen Thomas center.
Photo by Frank Wolfe, 1968.

President Lyndon B. Johnson holding a Press Conference in the White House Oval Office, Helen Thomas center.

Photo by Frank Wolfe, 1968.

usatoday:

Helen Thomas, the pioneering White House reporter who covered every president from John F. Kennedy to Barack Obama, died Saturday at 92.
For decades Thomas claimed a front seat in the White House press room, and she got to know most of the presidents she covered well. But she told USA TODAY in a 2006 interview that there is one thing all presidents have in common — they hate the media.
"You have to start with that premise. And as time goes on, their position is, ‘Who the hell are you? How dare you ask?’" she said.
Full story: http://usat.ly/17sQTdH
(Photo: HBO)

usatoday:

Helen Thomas, the pioneering White House reporter who covered every president from John F. Kennedy to Barack Obama, died Saturday at 92.

For decades Thomas claimed a front seat in the White House press room, and she got to know most of the presidents she covered well. But she told USA TODAY in a 2006 interview that there is one thing all presidents have in common — they hate the media.

"You have to start with that premise. And as time goes on, their position is, ‘Who the hell are you? How dare you ask?’" she said.

Full story: http://usat.ly/17sQTdH

(Photo: HBO)

nwkarchivist:

Barbara Walters Has Announced Her Retirement In 2014.  Let’s Not Forget How Groundbreaking She Was 40 Years Ago.

oaklandtribunearchives:

BLACK HISTORY MONTH

Today, in honor of Black History Month and the Oakland Tribune’s birthday, we celebrate Delilah Beasley.

Miss Beasley was born in Cincinnati in 1871. She began writing for her local paper at the age of 12 and later became a columnist for the Oakland Tribune becoming the first African American woman to be regularly published in a major metro newspaper. 

Beasley’s column “Activities Among Negroes” reported on the positive achievements and happenings in the black community in the Bay Area and nationwide. 

greatestgeneration:

In 1941, Elizabeth McIntosh was a reporter for the Honolulu Star-Bulletin. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, she wrote an article chronicling her experience that day and the following week. Her editors chose not to publish it. Today the Washington Post published her article for the very first time.

greatestgeneration:

In 1941, Elizabeth McIntosh was a reporter for the Honolulu Star-Bulletin. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, she wrote an article chronicling her experience that day and the following week. Her editors chose not to publish it. Today the Washington Post published her article for the very first time.

ourpresidents:

Barbara Walters interviews President Gerald R. Ford and Betty Ford.  December 4, 1976.

ourpresidents:

Barbara Walters interviews President Gerald R. Ford and Betty Ford.  December 4, 1976.

vanityfair:

The Passport to Prove It | A Stamped History of Marie Colvin’s Career
From the Colvin Family.

"Through the blurred ink of immigration stamps and festooned Middle Eastern visas, Marie Colvin’s passport reads like an illustrated time line for her coverage of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s election, the rise of the Taliban, the Arab Spring, Muammar Qaddafi’s capture and death, and the conflict in Syria. After becoming a foreign-affairs correspondent for London’s Sunday Timesin 1985, Colvin entered nearly every war zone on the planet right up to her death, in Homs, Syria, in February. With more than 150 stamps, this document confirms Colvin as the tireless reporter, always ready to board a plane headed for nowhere nice.”

vanityfair:

The Passport to Prove It | A Stamped History of Marie Colvin’s Career

From the Colvin Family.

"Through the blurred ink of immigration stamps and festooned Middle Eastern visas, Marie Colvin’s passport reads like an illustrated time line for her coverage of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s election, the rise of the Taliban, the Arab Spring, Muammar Qaddafi’s capture and death, and the conflict in Syria. After becoming a foreign-affairs correspondent for London’s Sunday Timesin 1985, Colvin entered nearly every war zone on the planet right up to her death, in Homs, Syria, in February. With more than 150 stamps, this document confirms Colvin as the tireless reporter, always ready to board a plane headed for nowhere nice.”

"I remember telephoning Robin Hankey, the secretary at the embassy in Warsaw, and saying, ‘The war’s begun’. He said, ‘Rubbish, they’re still negotiating’. And I said, ‘Can’t you hear it?’ So I hung the telephone out the window so he could listen to the Germans invading."

— Clare Hollingworth, the first journalist to report the outbreak of World War II

(Source: telegraph.co.uk)

publicaffairsbooks:

On this Administrative Professionals’ Day, a photo of our author Lynn Povich—who became the first woman senior editor at Newsweek—back when she was a researcher in the Paris office. Lynn’s book, The Good Girls Revolt: How the Women of Newsweek Sued their Bosses and Changed the Workplace, comes out in September.

publicaffairsbooks:

On this Administrative Professionals’ Day, a photo of our author Lynn Povich—who became the first woman senior editor at Newsweek—back when she was a researcher in the Paris office. Lynn’s book, The Good Girls Revolt: How the Women of Newsweek Sued their Bosses and Changed the Workplace, comes out in September.

picturesofwar:

War correspondent Lee Miller taking a bath in Hitler’s own bathtub, inside his abandoned apartment.
The photo was taken on the same day that Hitler committed suicide.
Munich, Germany - April 30, 1945.

picturesofwar:

War correspondent Lee Miller taking a bath in Hitler’s own bathtub, inside his abandoned apartment.

The photo was taken on the same day that Hitler committed suicide.

Munich, Germany - April 30, 1945.

(via picturesofwar-deactivated201307)

Nellie Bly, pen name of Elizabeth Jane Cochran
(1864-1922)
-Began reporting for a Pittsburgh newspaper on women’s issues (divorce, factory work) as a teenager
-Went undercover as a mental patient, leading to changes in how the mentally ill were treated
-Achieved a world record by travelling around the world in seventy two days
-Retired from journalism at 30 to marry a millionaire industrialist
-Took over her husband’s factory after his death
-Invented a type of milk can and a type of garbage can
-Returned to journalism in her 50s, her reporting on the outbreak of WWI made her the US’s first female war correspondent

Nellie Bly, pen name of Elizabeth Jane Cochran

(1864-1922)

-Began reporting for a Pittsburgh newspaper on women’s issues (divorce, factory work) as a teenager

-Went undercover as a mental patient, leading to changes in how the mentally ill were treated

-Achieved a world record by travelling around the world in seventy two days

-Retired from journalism at 30 to marry a millionaire industrialist

-Took over her husband’s factory after his death

-Invented a type of milk can and a type of garbage can

-Returned to journalism in her 50s, her reporting on the outbreak of WWI made her the US’s first female war correspondent

Journalist, lawyer and suffragette Lilla Day Monroe (1858-1929)
Lilla may have been the first woman to practice law in Kansas.  She also founded two newspapers.  In the 1920s, Lilla collected stories from Kansan pioneer women, developing a women’s history database.

Journalist, lawyer and suffragette Lilla Day Monroe (1858-1929)

Lilla may have been the first woman to practice law in Kansas.  She also founded two newspapers.  In the 1920s, Lilla collected stories from Kansan pioneer women, developing a women’s history database.

Alice Freeman/”Faith Fenton” (1857-1936)
Alice Freeman (1857-1936), better known by her pseudonym, Faith Fenton, was a Canadian schoolteacher and investigative journalist. The pseudonym was necessary because journalism was seen as an unacceptably disreputable activity for a teacher.  She became Canada’s first female columnist while writing for the Toronto Empire.   Her column, titled Women’s Empire, dealt with sexual discrimination, sexual harassment, child abuse and wage disparity.  She interviewed famous people of the day like Susan B. Anthony and Oliver Wendell Holmes.   Alice kept her double-identity secret from 1886 to 1893.  In 1894, she resigned her job as a schoolteacher and became a full-time journalist.

Alice Freeman/”Faith Fenton” (1857-1936)

Alice Freeman (1857-1936), better known by her pseudonym, Faith Fenton, was a Canadian schoolteacher and investigative journalist. The pseudonym was necessary because journalism was seen as an unacceptably disreputable activity for a teacher.  She became Canada’s first female columnist while writing for the Toronto Empire.   Her column, titled Women’s Empire, dealt with sexual discrimination, sexual harassment, child abuse and wage disparity.  She interviewed famous people of the day like Susan B. Anthony and Oliver Wendell Holmes.   Alice kept her double-identity secret from 1886 to 1893.  In 1894, she resigned her job as a schoolteacher and became a full-time journalist.