queenslibrary:

A Women’s History inspired Throwback Thursday photo — Servicemen pose with their hostesses at the Canteen and Social Centre in Jamaica. This canteen was one of many operated during World War I by the National League of Women’s Services, a civilian volunteer organization.

queenslibrary:

A Women’s History inspired Throwback Thursday photo — Servicemen pose with their hostesses at the Canteen and Social Centre in Jamaica. This canteen was one of many operated during World War I by the National League of Women’s Services, a civilian volunteer organization.

Pat Eng, found of New York Asian Women’s Center, via Makers

"By the eleventh minute of the fire—the sixth minute of the nightmare on the ninth floor—only two escape routes remained, and they, too, would be gone in thirty or sixty or ninety seconds more. To survive at this point required decisiveness, a sudden burst of action, and good luck, which was a vanishing commodity."

Triangle: The Fire That Changed America by David Von Drehle

Today is the 102nd anniversary of the Triangle Factory fire in which 146 women died.

wnyc:

Former New York State Senator Serf Maltese talks about how grandmother and her two daughters — ages 14 and 18 — were among the 146 who died in the fast-moving blaze that engulfed the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory on March 25, 1911.

nyu-university-programs:




In 1892, Mary B. Dennis became NYU’s first woman to receive a Ph.D. from the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Her dissertation was entitled “Science Teaching in the Elementary Schools.”


Source: NYU Bobst Library

nyu-university-programs:

In 1892, Mary B. Dennis became NYU’s first woman to receive a Ph.D. from the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Her dissertation was entitled “Science Teaching in the Elementary Schools.”

Source: NYU Bobst Library

Today is the 100th anniversary of New York’s Grand Central Station. Jackie Kennedy Onassis played a significant role in preserving Grand Central and other New York City landmarks.  A plaque in Grand Central commemorates Jackie’s role in preserving the station:

In an age when few people sought to preserve the architectural wonders that are a daily reminder of our rich and glorious past, a brave woman rose in protest to save this terminal from demolition. Because of her tireless and valiant efforts, it stands today as a monument to those who came before us and built the greatest city known to mankind. Preserving this great landmark is one of her many enduring legacies. The people of New York are forever grateful.

In the 1975 photo above Jackie is pictured with Ed Koch who was at the time serving in the House of Representatives.  He went on to serve as Mayor of New York City from 1978 to 1989.  Ed passed away today at age 88.

Today is the 100th anniversary of New York’s Grand Central Station. Jackie Kennedy Onassis played a significant role in preserving Grand Central and other New York City landmarks.  A plaque in Grand Central commemorates Jackie’s role in preserving the station:

In an age when few people sought to preserve the architectural wonders that are a daily reminder of our rich and glorious past, a brave woman rose in protest to save this terminal from demolition. Because of her tireless and valiant efforts, it stands today as a monument to those who came before us and built the greatest city known to mankind. Preserving this great landmark is one of her many enduring legacies. The people of New York are forever grateful.

In the 1975 photo above Jackie is pictured with Ed Koch who was at the time serving in the House of Representatives.  He went on to serve as Mayor of New York City from 1978 to 1989.  Ed passed away today at age 88.

nypl:


NYPL’s Hunts Point Library received a surprise visit today from Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor! Justice Sotomayor was visiting her hometown and decided to pay a visit to her old library stomping grounds in the Bronx. The staff from the Library, along with one of our patrons, were pleased to welcome her back to the branch!

nypl:

NYPL’s Hunts Point Library received a surprise visit today from Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor! Justice Sotomayor was visiting her hometown and decided to pay a visit to her old library stomping grounds in the Bronx. The staff from the Library, along with one of our patrons, were pleased to welcome her back to the branch!

Sampler by Maria Lalor, New York City, 1793.
Metropolitan Museum of Art

Sampler by Maria Lalor, New York City, 1793.

Metropolitan Museum of Art

livelymorgue:

After prohibiting them for 116 years, McSorley’s Old Ale House was ordered by Mayor John Lindsay to open its doors to women in 1970. The article from that August describes the first co-ed bar brawl in McSorley’s history, when Lucy Komisar, a vice-president of the National Organization for Women and pictured at right, was heckled and antagonized by patrons. Photo: Barton Silverman/The New York Times

You can still visit McSorley’s today and even visit the ladies room which was installed in 1986.

humansofnewyork:

These two women came from the Netherlands to run in the marathon today. Instead of moping about the event being cancelled, they spent their time volunteering on Staten Island. Saw so many people in running gear today, helping New Yorkers remove debris from their houses. Makes sense— because nobody who signed up for a marathon is afraid of hard work.

humansofnewyork:

These two women came from the Netherlands to run in the marathon today. Instead of moping about the event being cancelled, they spent their time volunteering on Staten Island. Saw so many people in running gear today, helping New Yorkers remove debris from their houses. Makes sense— because nobody who signed up for a marathon is afraid of hard work.

800 women strikers for peace on 47th St near the UN Building / World Telegram & Sun photo by Phil Stanziola, 1962.
Related: As it is the 50th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis, JFK Presidential Library has a number of Cuban Missile Crisis posts this week.   

800 women strikers for peace on 47th St near the UN Building / World Telegram & Sun photo by Phil Stanziola, 1962.

Related: As it is the 50th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis, JFK Presidential Library has a number of Cuban Missile Crisis posts this week.   

inspiringdresses:



Emily Warren Roebling, who had a significant role in the building of the Brooklyn Bridge, wore this gown for her formal presentation to Queen Victoria in 1896. Robeling was the wife of Washington Augustus Roebling (1837-1926), the chief engineer of the bridge, and took over day-to-day supervision of the project for a period of fourteen years after husband became ill and was unable to visit the construction site. Although she had no formal training, Roebling’s extensive knowledge of engineering contributed significantly to the successful completion of the bridge in 1886.Presentation at court was a special event for American women of Roebling’s social status and court protocol regulated men’s and women’s formal attire for the event. The lavish embroidery, sumptuous textiles and long train are characteristics of the formal gown, making it appropriate for the occasion. Roebling appears to have had a sentimental attachment to the ensemble; she chose to wear it again for her portrait by Charles-Émile-Auguste Carolus-Duran (1838–1917) which is also now part of the Brooklyn Museum collection.

inspiringdresses:

Emily Warren Roebling, who had a significant role in the building of the Brooklyn Bridge, wore this gown for her formal presentation to Queen Victoria in 1896. Robeling was the wife of Washington Augustus Roebling (1837-1926), the chief engineer of the bridge, and took over day-to-day supervision of the project for a period of fourteen years after husband became ill and was unable to visit the construction site. Although she had no formal training, Roebling’s extensive knowledge of engineering contributed significantly to the successful completion of the bridge in 1886.
Presentation at court was a special event for American women of Roebling’s social status and court protocol regulated men’s and women’s formal attire for the event. The lavish embroidery, sumptuous textiles and long train are characteristics of the formal gown, making it appropriate for the occasion. Roebling appears to have had a sentimental attachment to the ensemble; she chose to wear it again for her portrait by Charles-Émile-Auguste Carolus-Duran (1838–1917) which is also now part of the Brooklyn Museum collection.

Trudy Ederle (left), the first woman to swim the English Channel, with her sister.
The daughter of German immigrants, Trudy was born in New York City in 1905.  She trained at the Women’s Swimming Association along with future Olympians Ethelda Bleibtrey, Helen Wainwright, Aileen Riggin, and Eleanor Holm, as well as future movie star Esther Williams.  It was at the Women’s Swimming Association that the American crawl was developed, the stroke Trudy would eventually use to swim the English Channel.  
At the 1924 Summer Olympics in Paris, Trudy won a gold medal as a part of the US 400 m freestyle relay team and bronze medals for the 100 m and 400 m freestyle races.
Trudy first attempted to swim the English Channel in 1925, but she was disqualified when her coach, mistakenly thinking she was in peril, had her pulled from the water.  Although failing to swim the Channel was far more common than succeeding, when Trudy attempted the swim again, a London newspaper ran a front page editorial arguing that her failed attempt a year earlier proved that women were athletically inferior to men. 
Despite the opinions of sexist critics, Trudy’s second swim was successful and she became the first woman to swim the English Channel in 1926.  At that point, five men had completed the swim.  The fastest time belonged to Enrique Tiraboschi, who swam the Channel in 16 hours and 33 minutes.  Trudy beat his time, swimming the Channel in 14 hours 39 minutes,
Hearing impaired since a bout of measles as a child, Trudy was almost completely deaf by age 40.  In her later years, she taught swimming to deaf children.  Trudy passed away in 2003 at the age of 97.
Three recent books have been published about Trudy Ederle and the competition to be the first woman to swim the English Channel: America’s Girl, The Great Swim, and Young Woman and the Sea.

Trudy Ederle (left), the first woman to swim the English Channel, with her sister.

The daughter of German immigrants, Trudy was born in New York City in 1905.  She trained at the Women’s Swimming Association along with future Olympians Ethelda Bleibtrey, Helen Wainwright, Aileen Riggin, and Eleanor Holm, as well as future movie star Esther Williams.  It was at the Women’s Swimming Association that the American crawl was developed, the stroke Trudy would eventually use to swim the English Channel. 

At the 1924 Summer Olympics in Paris, Trudy won a gold medal as a part of the US 400 m freestyle relay team and bronze medals for the 100 m and 400 m freestyle races.

Trudy first attempted to swim the English Channel in 1925, but she was disqualified when her coach, mistakenly thinking she was in peril, had her pulled from the water.  Although failing to swim the Channel was far more common than succeeding, when Trudy attempted the swim again, a London newspaper ran a front page editorial arguing that her failed attempt a year earlier proved that women were athletically inferior to men.

Despite the opinions of sexist critics, Trudy’s second swim was successful and she became the first woman to swim the English Channel in 1926.  At that point, five men had completed the swim.  The fastest time belonged to Enrique Tiraboschi, who swam the Channel in 16 hours and 33 minutes.  Trudy beat his time, swimming the Channel in 14 hours 39 minutes,

Hearing impaired since a bout of measles as a child, Trudy was almost completely deaf by age 40.  In her later years, she taught swimming to deaf children.  Trudy passed away in 2003 at the age of 97.

Three recent books have been published about Trudy Ederle and the competition to be the first woman to swim the English Channel: America’s Girl, The Great Swim, and Young Woman and the Sea.

"People survived thanks to a short head start, or a seat assignment near an exit, or by following the right mad rush in one direction or another—or by ignoring the wrong mad rush. They survived by acting a bit more quickly, or boldly, or brutally. But the truth is most people working on the ninth floor that day did not survive at all."

Chinese school children in Central Park.
The PS on their sashes stands for Public School and that numbering system is still in use today in New York City.  However, as the numbers were created as schools were built in each borough of New York City, there are four PS 108s, one each in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx.  My guess is that these students were from what is today PS 108 Assemblyman Angelo Del Toro Educational Complex in Manhattan.

Chinese school children in Central Park.

The PS on their sashes stands for Public School and that numbering system is still in use today in New York City.  However, as the numbers were created as schools were built in each borough of New York City, there are four PS 108s, one each in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx.  My guess is that these students were from what is today PS 108 Assemblyman Angelo Del Toro Educational Complex in Manhattan.