columbusdispatch:

Fifty years ago today, central Ohio native Jerrie Mock became the first woman to fly solo around the world.
This photo ran in The Columbus Dispatch in May that year, on the day President Lyndon B. Johnson honored Jerrie Mock by presenting her with a Federal Aviation Agency gold medal in ceremonies at the White House. (The photo, by Dispatch photographer Sheldon Ross, captures Mock with a cup of coffee while awaiting final flight plans shortly before takeoff on March 19.)
Read more about Mock’s historic flight at our library staff’s A Look Back blog on Dispatch.com.

columbusdispatch:

Fifty years ago today, central Ohio native Jerrie Mock became the first woman to fly solo around the world.

This photo ran in The Columbus Dispatch in May that year, on the day President Lyndon B. Johnson honored Jerrie Mock by presenting her with a Federal Aviation Agency gold medal in ceremonies at the White House. (The photo, by Dispatch photographer Sheldon Ross, captures Mock with a cup of coffee while awaiting final flight plans shortly before takeoff on March 19.)

Read more about Mock’s historic flight at our library staff’s A Look Back blog on Dispatch.com.

Belle Sherwin, President of the National League of Women Voters, holding a silver cup to be awarded to the state League showing the greatest increase in voting between 1920 and 1924.
I recently posted an image of Cleveland’s woman suffrage headquarters.  An eagle eyed follower wondered whether the Belle Sherwin in that picture was any relation to the the paint company Sherwin-Williams which is headquartered in Cleveland.  Turns out, Belle Sherwin is the daughter of Sherwin-Williams co-founder Henry Sherwin and his wife Frances Smith.  Belle was an important figure in Cleveland and played a substantial role in several national and international organizations.
A short list of Belle’s accomplishments:
-Graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Wellesley
-Taught school in Boston and Connecticut
-Organized the Cleveland Consumers’ League
-Served on the board of the Visiting Nurse Association of Cleveland
-Served on the board of the National Urban League, a civil right organization
-President of the Woman Suffrage Party of Greater Cleveland
-Vice President, then President of the National League of Women Voters
-Led the US delegations at the 1926 and 1928 congresses for the International Alliance of Women for Suffrage and Equal Citizenship
-Appointed by FDR to the Consumers’ Advisory Board of the National Recovery Administration and to the Federal Advisory Council of the US Employment Service 
-Vice President of the National Municipal League
-Vice President for North America of the Inter-American Union of Women
-Received honorary degrees from Case Western Reserve, Denison, and Oberlin

Belle Sherwin, President of the National League of Women Voters, holding a silver cup to be awarded to the state League showing the greatest increase in voting between 1920 and 1924.

I recently posted an image of Cleveland’s woman suffrage headquarters.  An eagle eyed follower wondered whether the Belle Sherwin in that picture was any relation to the the paint company Sherwin-Williams which is headquartered in Cleveland.  Turns out, Belle Sherwin is the daughter of Sherwin-Williams co-founder Henry Sherwin and his wife Frances Smith.  Belle was an important figure in Cleveland and played a substantial role in several national and international organizations.

A short list of Belle’s accomplishments:

-Graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Wellesley

-Taught school in Boston and Connecticut

-Organized the Cleveland Consumers’ League

-Served on the board of the Visiting Nurse Association of Cleveland

-Served on the board of the National Urban League, a civil right organization

-President of the Woman Suffrage Party of Greater Cleveland

-Vice President, then President of the National League of Women Voters

-Led the US delegations at the 1926 and 1928 congresses for the International Alliance of Women for Suffrage and Equal Citizenship

-Appointed by FDR to the Consumers’ Advisory Board of the National Recovery Administration and to the Federal Advisory Council of the US Employment Service 

-Vice President of the National Municipal League

-Vice President for North America of the Inter-American Union of Women

-Received honorary degrees from Case Western Reserve, Denison, and Oberlin

Woman suffrage headquarters in Upper Euclid Avenue, Cleveland.
A. (at extreme right) is Miss Belle Sherwin, President, National League of Women Voters; B. is Judge Florence E. Allen (holding the flag); C. is Mrs. Malcolm McBride.

Woman suffrage headquarters in Upper Euclid Avenue, Cleveland.

A. (at extreme right) is Miss Belle Sherwin, President, National League of Women Voters; B. is Judge Florence E. Allen (holding the flag); C. is Mrs. Malcolm McBride.

Cora Dow (1868-1915) was a pioneering pharmacist who created a chain of successful drugstores.  The second woman to qualify as a pharmacist in the US, Cora transformed her father’s run down shop into a successful chain by implementing cut rate prices, developing quality store brands and maintaining a high level of customer service.  
Despite her successful career, Cora was anti-suffrage and claimed that she would have been happier as a housewife.  Yet Cora was such a well known business woman during her lifetime that former president William Howard Taft eulogized her.
A detailed article describing Cora’s life and her business practices can be found here.   

Cora Dow (1868-1915) was a pioneering pharmacist who created a chain of successful drugstores.  The second woman to qualify as a pharmacist in the US, Cora transformed her father’s run down shop into a successful chain by implementing cut rate prices, developing quality store brands and maintaining a high level of customer service.  

Despite her successful career, Cora was anti-suffrage and claimed that she would have been happier as a housewife.  Yet Cora was such a well known business woman during her lifetime that former president William Howard Taft eulogized her.

A detailed article describing Cora’s life and her business practices can be found here.   

Ideal, not actual policewoman, Cincinnati, 1909
The reason she was ideal and not actual is that the concept of a female police officer was so foreign to the people of Cincinnati that the local suffragettes felt it necessary to demonstrate what a policewoman would look like.

Ideal, not actual policewoman, Cincinnati, 1909

The reason she was ideal and not actual is that the concept of a female police officer was so foreign to the people of Cincinnati that the local suffragettes felt it necessary to demonstrate what a policewoman would look like.

An 1884 petition signed by 139 residence of Jefferson Township, Ohio requesting their congressman support an amendment for women’s suffrage. 

An 1884 petition signed by 139 residence of Jefferson Township, Ohio requesting their congressman support an amendment for women’s suffrage.