Workers punching the clock at the SKF roller bearing factory in Philadelphia, PA.
1942/1943

Workers punching the clock at the SKF roller bearing factory in Philadelphia, PA.

1942/1943

Mrs. Juliann Jane Tillman, preacher of the A.M.E. Church, Engraving by Peter Duval, after a painting by Alfred Hoffy, Philadelphia, 1844.  


Although little is known about the preacher pictured here, Juliann Jane Tillman, African Methodist Episcopal church records acknowledge that the first bishop, Richard Allen, recognized that some women possessed evangelical and teaching gifts. Although women were not allowed to become church leaders in the early years, they were permitted to teach and preach. Some became itinerant evangelists. Today, the A.M.E. Church allows women to pastor churches and hold other high offices within the church hierarchy.
Spread by mosquitoes, yellow fever causes nausea, fever, and bleeding.  In extreme cases, liver damage and jaundice (yellowing of the skin and/or eyes) can occur.  Today, vaccination exists for those who live in high risk areas, mosquito control can be used to prevent outbreaks of yellow fever, and modern medicine can greatly improves the survival rate of those who become infected.  Still, the WHO estimates that 200,000 people become infected with yellow fever each year and of those, 30,000 people die.  90% of yellow fever cases today occur in Africa.   
The yellow fever epidemic of 1793 was catastrophic for Philadelphia.  The city had a population of 50,000 and recorded 4,044 death between August 1 and November 1.  Many people fled the city and those who remained struggled to find basic necessities under quarantine.
Laurie Halse Anderson’s Fever 1793 follows a fictional 14 year old named Mattie Cook during this epidemic.  As the city falls apart and those she loves become infected, Mattie must find ways to survive in a calamitous situation.  
Fever 1793 skews younger than most of the books I’ve recommended as Amazon lists it for ages 10 and up, but it is full of historical details and worth reading for anyone interested in early American history or what it is like to live through an epidemic.

Spread by mosquitoes, yellow fever causes nausea, fever, and bleeding.  In extreme cases, liver damage and jaundice (yellowing of the skin and/or eyes) can occur.  Today, vaccination exists for those who live in high risk areas, mosquito control can be used to prevent outbreaks of yellow fever, and modern medicine can greatly improves the survival rate of those who become infected.  Still, the WHO estimates that 200,000 people become infected with yellow fever each year and of those, 30,000 people die.  90% of yellow fever cases today occur in Africa.   

The yellow fever epidemic of 1793 was catastrophic for Philadelphia.  The city had a population of 50,000 and recorded 4,044 death between August 1 and November 1.  Many people fled the city and those who remained struggled to find basic necessities under quarantine.

Laurie Halse Anderson’s Fever 1793 follows a fictional 14 year old named Mattie Cook during this epidemic.  As the city falls apart and those she loves become infected, Mattie must find ways to survive in a calamitous situation.  

Fever 1793 skews younger than most of the books I’ve recommended as Amazon lists it for ages 10 and up, but it is full of historical details and worth reading for anyone interested in early American history or what it is like to live through an epidemic.

Embroidered sampler, 1795Mary JonesPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania
On view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (NYC), Gallery 727

This sampler is one of a small group created in Philadelphia during the second half of the eighteenth century. Known as Dresden-work samplers, they are made of white linen decorated with white drawnwork and needlepoint-lace insertions. Unlike most examples, which are entirely white, Mary Jones ornamented her piece with a colorful floral border. A circle of gold leaf inserted behind the central circle of lace further highlights her intricate work.

Embroidered sampler, 1795
Mary Jones
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

On view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (NYC), Gallery 727

This sampler is one of a small group created in Philadelphia during the second half of the eighteenth century. Known as Dresden-work samplers, they are made of white linen decorated with white drawnwork and needlepoint-lace insertions. Unlike most examples, which are entirely white, Mary Jones ornamented her piece with a colorful floral border. A circle of gold leaf inserted behind the central circle of lace further highlights her intricate work.
Mary Emma Allison with her three children in 1954
A minister’s wife and school librarian, Mary Emma Allison was interested in how American children could help needy children abroad.  In 1949, she noticed a children’s costume parade in Philadelphia encouraging people to donate to UNICEF.  Inspired, Mary Emma wrote a piece for her husband’s Presbyterian magazine suggesting children collect funds for UNICEF while they trick or treated.  Her 1950 article recommended milk cartons like those pictured above be used.   
In 1950, Trick or Treat for UNICEF raised $17 in Philadelphia.  Over the last 61 years, it has raised over $160 million in the US alone.  Donations can also be made online in the US and Canada.

Mary Emma Allison with her three children in 1954

A minister’s wife and school librarian, Mary Emma Allison was interested in how American children could help needy children abroad.  In 1949, she noticed a children’s costume parade in Philadelphia encouraging people to donate to UNICEF.  Inspired, Mary Emma wrote a piece for her husband’s Presbyterian magazine suggesting children collect funds for UNICEF while they trick or treated.  Her 1950 article recommended milk cartons like those pictured above be used.   

In 1950, Trick or Treat for UNICEF raised $17 in Philadelphia.  Over the last 61 years, it has raised over $160 million in the US alone.  Donations can also be made online in the US and Canada.

Women painting in Rittenhouse Square, Philadelphia.

Women painting in Rittenhouse Square, Philadelphia.

Philadelphia, 1934.

Philadelphia, 1934.

Celebrating the 31st anniversary of the Women’s Pennsylvania Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals horse watering stations
Philadelphia, 1939
Once common in Philadelphia, these stations provided water for horses pulling carriages, trucks, and cable cars through the streets.  A surviving water station can be seen at the corner of South Street and Grays Ferry.

Celebrating the 31st anniversary of the Women’s Pennsylvania Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals horse watering stations

Philadelphia, 1939

Once common in Philadelphia, these stations provided water for horses pulling carriages, trucks, and cable cars through the streets.  A surviving water station can be seen at the corner of South Street and Grays Ferry.