theoxfordamerican:

Eudora Welty: 27 Portraits

A year before her first story was published, Eudora Welty was working as a junior publicity agent for the Works Progress Administration, documenting the effects of the Great Depression on rural Mississippi. She traveled from town to town taking snapshots that she would later develop in a darkroom set up in her kitchen.  

"Making pictures of people in all sorts of situations, I learned that every feeling waits upon its gesture, and I had to be prepared to recognize this moment when I saw it," she wrote of those experiences. "These were things a story writer needed to know."

Some of her photographs have just gone on display at the Wiljax Gallery in Cleveland, Mississippi.  Presented in conjunction with the Eudora Welty Foundation, “Eudora Welty: 27 Portraits” is a small exhibition that reveals Welty as a gifted photographer and offers viewers a unique glimpse into the Depression-era South.

We at the OA are huge fans of Welty’s camerawork. One of her photos graced the cover of our second issue, back in 1992.  Her portraiture, like her writing, is subtle, beautiful, and without pretention.  Even if she hadn’t become a major voice in Southern literature, her pictures merit viewing in their own right.

The exhibit runs until October 25.  For more information, check out the gallery website.

life:

Photographer Margaret Bourke-White with the U.S. Bomber Command in England, 1942. See more photos here.
(Margaret Bourke-White—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

life:

Photographer Margaret Bourke-White with the U.S. Bomber Command in England, 1942. See more photos here.

(Margaret Bourke-White—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

howpeoplelived:

Photographs by Lady Clementina Hawarden (1822-1865).

Hawarden gained prominence in the photography world at a time when the art form was dominated by men, and her work allowed other female photographers to gain recognition of their skills. Her work was exhibited in the Photographic Society of London, and was twice awarded the Society’s silver medal. Most of her photographs include portraits of other women, especially her daughters. She took advantage of natural light through the frequent use of mirrors and windows, and some works included elaborate costumes. 

Source

burnedshoes:

© Margaret Bourke-White, 1937, Louisville, Kentucky, Great Ohio River Flood
Bourke-White’s classic Great Depression photograph was originally only one of many images she made while covering a far more particular, localized catastrophe: namely the devastating Ohio River flood of 1937, which claimed close to 400 lives and left roughly one million people homeless across five states in the winter of that terrible year. (+)
Find more pictures here.

burnedshoes:

© Margaret Bourke-White, 1937, Louisville, Kentucky, Great Ohio River Flood

Bourke-White’s classic Great Depression photograph was originally only one of many images she made while covering a far more particular, localized catastrophe: namely the devastating Ohio River flood of 1937, which claimed close to 400 lives and left roughly one million people homeless across five states in the winter of that terrible year. (+)

Find more pictures here.

(Source: burnedshoes)

For over 40 years, Vivian Maier worked as a nanny and spent her free time as a street photographer.  Intensely private, she never showed her work to anyone, but left a legacy of over 100,000 negatives.  These negatives were discovered by a local historian at an auction house in 2007 and since then her prints have been exhibited at museums from Los Angeles to Oslo.  Lanny Silverman, a curator at the Chicago Cultural Centre, believes that  "the best of [Vivian’s] work ranks up there with anybody. She covers humanist portraiture and street life, she covers children, she covers abstraction and she does them all with a style that I think digests the history of photography.”

Above are some examples of Vivian’s work.  The photo at the top left is a self portrait taken in 1953.  Vivian Maier: Street Photographer, the first book of her photography was published in 2011.


The Camera Queen
Margaret Bourke-White, who saw beauty in the lines of a steel girder and the blackness of a coal mine, pioneers a new era of photography.
by Richard H. Parke
WHEN I called on Margaret Bourke-White in her spacious penthouse studio in a Fifth Avenue office building, she had just returned to New York from photographing a new textile mill in the South. Piled high in the center of the vast room was the equipment she had carried with her: A couple of cameras, a box of flashlight bulbs, a folded tripod and three or four travel-scarred suitcases. To me, they represented Exhibit A in the fast-accumulating evidence to prove that this dark-eyed, intense young woman is one of the world’s greatest photographers. I saw in them the spirit of adventure and pioneering which is the secret of her success, the same spirit which led her to go to New York ten years ago and embark on the development of an idea which was peculiarly her own.
Briefly, that idea was that there is beauty in industry—a beauty that lies in the clean-cut lines of a steel girder, the towering majesty of a city skyscraper, the shower of sparks from a blazing coke oven, the sombre blackness of a coal mine. She knew that the faces of factory workers could wear the nobility of statesmen, that farmers could plow their fields with the grace of athletes and that the skill in a workman’s toss of a red-hot rivet could be compared with the marksmanship of a rifleman.
Read the rest of the article here.

The Camera Queen

Margaret Bourke-White, who saw beauty in the lines of a steel girder and the blackness of a coal mine, pioneers a new era of photography.

by Richard H. Parke

WHEN I called on Margaret Bourke-White in her spacious penthouse studio in a Fifth Avenue office building, she had just returned to New York from photographing a new textile mill in the South. Piled high in the center of the vast room was the equipment she had carried with her: A couple of cameras, a box of flashlight bulbs, a folded tripod and three or four travel-scarred suitcases.

To me, they represented Exhibit A in the fast-accumulating evidence to prove that this dark-eyed, intense young woman is one of the world’s greatest photographers. I saw in them the spirit of adventure and pioneering which is the secret of her success, the same spirit which led her to go to New York ten years ago and embark on the development of an idea which was peculiarly her own.

Briefly, that idea was that there is beauty in industry—a beauty that lies in the clean-cut lines of a steel girder, the towering majesty of a city skyscraper, the shower of sparks from a blazing coke oven, the sombre blackness of a coal mine. She knew that the faces of factory workers could wear the nobility of statesmen, that farmers could plow their fields with the grace of athletes and that the skill in a workman’s toss of a red-hot rivet could be compared with the marksmanship of a rifleman.

Read the rest of the article here.

(Source: life)

life:

You know the cover well — the very first issue of LIFE Magazine. Shot by the one and only Margaret Bourke-White.  To state the obvious, no one could even begin to encompass Margaret Bourke-White’s achievements as a LIFE photographer and as a journalist.

Here, on Margaret Bourke-White’s birthday (she was born June 14, 1904, in the Bronx), LIFE.com presents a number of her most recognizable photos, all of which appeared in a wonderful article in the June 28, 1963, issue of LIFE titled, “Great Lady With a Camera” — a celebration of the photographer that the magazine published in conjunction with the release of Bourke-White’s autobiography, Portrait of Myself.

“Miss Bourke-White,” LIFE told its readers, “for 25 years a member of LIFE’s staff, has put her career into an autobiography…. The following pages include a sampling of her photographs along with her gay and moving story, taken from the book, of a tyro’s first steps to success.”

See the photos on LIFE.com here.

youbrokemythunder:

A suffragette stand at the Women’s Exhibition of 1909, in a photograph taken by Christina Broom, the first British female press photographer.

youbrokemythunder:

A suffragette stand at the Women’s Exhibition of 1909, in a photograph taken by Christina Broom, the first British female press photographer.

(via youbrokemythunder-deactivated20)

timelightbox:

Eve Arnold: April 12, 1912—January 4, 2012.
“If a photographer cares about the people before the lens and is compassionate, much is given. It is the photographer, not the camera, that is the instrument.”—Eve Arnold. See more here.

timelightbox:

Eve Arnold: April 12, 1912—January 4, 2012.

“If a photographer cares about the people before the lens and is compassionate, much is given. It is the photographer, not the camera, that is the instrument.”—Eve Arnold. See more here.

kateoplis:


Horse training for the militia, Mongolia, 1979, by Eve Arnold (1912-2012)

kateoplis:

Horse training for the militia, Mongolia, 1979, by Eve Arnold (1912-2012)

greatestgeneration:

Here are a few articles about war correspondent Lee Miller:
NYTimes: at’s A Girl To Do When A Battle Lands In Her Lap?

I had come to trawl through Miller’s letters, her notebooks from World War II; her negatives, her prints; and finally, in the room that was her bedroom, slip on her wool war-correspondent’s uniform.

Telegraph: On The Front Line

When you think that she came from the art world, with the background of being one of May Ray’s beautiful nude models, to the ugly world of death and destruction, the transition was extraordinary. One has to admire that more than other things about her.

Telegraph: Lee Miller and Man Ray, Crazy In Love

She was the unrivalled beauty, he the fearsome artist who made even Picasso seem reserved. They loved each other with a fury that was to tear them apart. Yet, as a new exhibition reveals, they would eventually, against all odds, find their happy ending.

Daily Beast: Model Photographer

The editor of British Vogue sent Miller to do stories on a field hospital in Normandy, the liberation of Paris and the siege of St-Malo; she wrote the text as well as taking the pictures. She rode into Germany with the U.S. Army, starkly documenting the corpses and the ovens of Buchenwald and Dachau—and zooming in, almost poetically, on a dead SS guard floating in a canal. 

The Independent: Why did MI5 spy on glamorous Vogue photographer Lee Miller?

One the most candid portraits taken of the model turned war photographer Lee Miller shows a beautiful but exhausted woman washing herself in Adolf Hitler’s bathtub. The famous frame, taken by fellow war photographer David E Scherman, captures the remarkable life of a woman who went from starring on the cover of Vogue to the front line. Today a new and no less remarkable chapter in Miller’s life will be uncovered.

greatestgeneration:

Here are a few articles about war correspondent Lee Miller:

NYTimes: at’s A Girl To Do When A Battle Lands In Her Lap?

I had come to trawl through Miller’s letters, her notebooks from World War II; her negatives, her prints; and finally, in the room that was her bedroom, slip on her wool war-correspondent’s uniform.

Telegraph: On The Front Line

When you think that she came from the art world, with the background of being one of May Ray’s beautiful nude models, to the ugly world of death and destruction, the transition was extraordinary. One has to admire that more than other things about her.

Telegraph: Lee Miller and Man Ray, Crazy In Love

She was the unrivalled beauty, he the fearsome artist who made even Picasso seem reserved. They loved each other with a fury that was to tear them apart. Yet, as a new exhibition reveals, they would eventually, against all odds, find their happy ending.

Daily Beast: Model Photographer

The editor of British Vogue sent Miller to do stories on a field hospital in Normandy, the liberation of Paris and the siege of St-Malo; she wrote the text as well as taking the pictures. She rode into Germany with the U.S. Army, starkly documenting the corpses and the ovens of Buchenwald and Dachau—and zooming in, almost poetically, on a dead SS guard floating in a canal. 

The Independent: Why did MI5 spy on glamorous Vogue photographer Lee Miller?

One the most candid portraits taken of the model turned war photographer Lee Miller shows a beautiful but exhausted woman washing herself in Adolf Hitler’s bathtub. The famous frame, taken by fellow war photographer David E Scherman, captures the remarkable life of a woman who went from starring on the cover of Vogue to the front line. Today a new and no less remarkable chapter in Miller’s life will be uncovered.

picturesofwar:

War correspondent Lee Miller taking a bath in Hitler’s own bathtub, inside his abandoned apartment.
The photo was taken on the same day that Hitler committed suicide.
Munich, Germany - April 30, 1945.

picturesofwar:

War correspondent Lee Miller taking a bath in Hitler’s own bathtub, inside his abandoned apartment.

The photo was taken on the same day that Hitler committed suicide.

Munich, Germany - April 30, 1945.

(via picturesofwar-deactivated201307)

itsjohnsen:

Air Raid over the Kremlin, Moscow, 1941.Margaret Bourke-White

Already the first foreign photographer permitted to document Soviet industry, Margaret Bourke-White was the only foreign photographer on the ground when Germany attacked the USSR.  

itsjohnsen:

Air Raid over the Kremlin, Moscow, 1941.
Margaret Bourke-White

Already the first foreign photographer permitted to document Soviet industry, Margaret Bourke-White was the only foreign photographer on the ground when Germany attacked the USSR.  

"Portrait of the Photographer," manipulated self-portrait by Gertrude Käsebier, circa 1899.
Although she became one of the most influential turn of the century American photographers, Gertrude Käsebier did not begin her career as a photographer until her late 30s.  At 37, she enrolled at the Pratt Institute to study painting and drawing, but she was quickly drawn to photography.  Ten years after she began her artistic studies, Alfred Stieglitz proclaimed her the leading artistic portrait photographer of the day.  
A mother of three, Gertrude was influenced by educationalist Friedrich Fröbel who developed the concept of kindergarten.   The bond between mother and child became a reoccurring theme in Gertrude’s work.  She preferred to photograph mothers in the act of mothering- rocking a baby, helping a child out the door, nursing, reading a story.  Some of her mother and child photographs have titles such as “Blessed art thou among women” which connect the Virgin Mary to mothers of the day.
Gertrude is also known for her photographs of Native Americans working at Buffalo Bill’s Wild West, but her best known image to modern audiences is probably her portrait of Evelyn Nesbitt.
An advocate for female photographers, Gertrude helped to establish the Women’s Professional Photographers Association of America.  Photographer Frances Benjamin Johnson was among her admirers and friends.  

"Portrait of the Photographer," manipulated self-portrait by Gertrude Käsebier, circa 1899.

Although she became one of the most influential turn of the century American photographers, Gertrude Käsebier did not begin her career as a photographer until her late 30s.  At 37, she enrolled at the Pratt Institute to study painting and drawing, but she was quickly drawn to photography.  Ten years after she began her artistic studies, Alfred Stieglitz proclaimed her the leading artistic portrait photographer of the day

A mother of three, Gertrude was influenced by educationalist Friedrich Fröbel who developed the concept of kindergarten.   The bond between mother and child became a reoccurring theme in Gertrude’s work.  She preferred to photograph mothers in the act of mothering- rocking a baby, helping a child out the door, nursing, reading a story.  Some of her mother and child photographs have titles such as “Blessed art thou among women” which connect the Virgin Mary to mothers of the day.

Gertrude is also known for her photographs of Native Americans working at Buffalo Bill’s Wild West, but her best known image to modern audiences is probably her portrait of Evelyn Nesbitt.

An advocate for female photographers, Gertrude helped to establish the Women’s Professional Photographers Association of America.  Photographer Frances Benjamin Johnson was among her admirers and friends.  

A Japanese women dressed in a kimono is seated holding a samisen, a Japanese strigned instrument. 
Lantern slide by Gertrude Bass Warner.

A Japanese women dressed in a kimono is seated holding a samisen, a Japanese strigned instrument. 

Lantern slide by Gertrude Bass Warner.